subcontractor


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sub·con·trac·tor

 (sŭb-kŏn′trăk′tər, sŭb′kən-trăk′tər)
n.
One who agrees to perform part of the work specified in a previous contract between a contractor and another party.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

subcontractor

(ˌsʌbkənˈtræktə)
n
(Commerce) a person, company, etc, that enters into a subcontract, esp a firm that undertakes to complete part of another's contract
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sub•con•trac•tor

(sʌbˈkɒn træk tər, ˈsʌbˌkɒn-, ˌsʌb kənˈtræk tər)

n.
a person or business that contracts to provide a service, materials, etc., necessary to fulfill another's contract, esp. a person or business that contracts to do part of another's work.
[1835–45]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subcontractor - someone who enters into a subcontract with the primary contractor
contractor - someone (a person or firm) who contracts to build things
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
مُقاوِل فَرْعي
subdodavatel
underentreprenør
alvállalkozó
undirverktaki
subrangovas
subdodávateľ

subcontractor

[ˌsʌbkənˈtræktəʳ] Nsubcontratista mf
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

subcontractor

[ˌsʌbkənˈtræktər] nsous-traitant m
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

subcontractor

[ˌsʌbkənˈtræktəʳ] nsubappaltatore/trice
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

subcontractor

(sabkənˈtrӕktə) , ((American) sabˈkontraktər) noun
a person who undertakes work for a contractor and is therefore not directly employed by the person who wants such work done. The building contractor has employed several subcontractors to build the block of flats.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.
References in periodicals archive ?
The original statute required subcontractors, upon request by the direct contractor, to provide itemized wage statements or other payroll records containing "information sufficient to apprise the requesting party of the subcontractors' payment status in making fringe or other benefit payments or contributions." Upon request, subcontractors were also required to provide direct contractors with information about their lower-tier subcontractors, If a subcontractor failed to provide this information in a timely fashion, the direct contractor could withhold as "disputed" all sums owed to the subcontractor until the information is provided.
Though RTL successfully completed its work as long ago as 2017, Tarraf still owes the subcontractor nearly $50,000 on those projects, Shawn Larson, RTL's co-owner, said in an interview.
> Your subcontractor maintains a set of books and records that reflect all of the business' income and expenses.
For those projects, the Miller Act restricts claimants on payment bonds to those who had a contract with the prime contractor and those who had a contract with a subcontractor, provided that in the latter case the claimant provides notice to the prime contractor.
(FIGRPMPTSC) President and CEO Ruby Pacis clarified the misconceptions about subcontracting, saying it becomes illicit if the subcontractor is into labor-only contracting.
The Main Contractor entered into a subcontract agreement ("Subcontract Agreement") with a MEP subcontractor ("Subcontractor") with a total amount of AED 60 million.
Tightening schedules: Another local symptom of the labor shortage is lack of wiggle room in subcontractor scheduling.
If the employee sues the upper-tier contractor under the parameters of New York Labor law 240, and the contractor attempts to tender a claim to the subcontractor's insurer, per the indemnification or hold harmless wording in the contract, the insurance carrier would likely deny coverage.
The notion that this type of information-gathering is required suffered a substantial blow in a recent decision by the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals, which decisively rejected arguments from the Defense Contract Audit Agency and a contracting officer that a prime contractor's costs should be disallowed because the prime contractor could not produce detailed incurred cost information regarding its subcontractor's performance.
The ordinary position can be overridden by express contract provisions holding the employer responsible for the nominated subcontractor but such provisions are unlikely.
If an owner or general contractor wants to reduce slip-and-fall claims, a per-claim, slip-and-fall allocation of, say, $10,000 would be applied to the subcontractor's claim experience target (or expected claim level).