subdividable

subdividable

(ˌsʌbdɪˈvaɪdəbəl) or

subdivisible

adj
capable of being subdivided
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
In its lawsuit, the lender contended the appraiser made a serious error by incorrectly determining zoning, reporting the land to have subdividable agricultural zoning when it allegedly had agricultural/preservation zoning that prevented subdivision.
Having subdividable floorplates allows us to lease our buildings to a diverse user base of high-credit tenants and easily meet a user's changing space needs.
The largest blocks of available space, all of which are subdividable, can be found at 500 Mamaroneck Ave.
For the first time in several years, MerrittView has a large contiguous block of subdividable space available for immediate occupancy: the full sixth floor, measuring nearly 44,000 s/f.
The difference between these particulars is said to be that the inhabitants of the Habitat are said to "possess and own" their expressions in the domains, while these, the actualities, are owned.(32) Aristotle's distinction between form and matter seems to be embodied in the correlativity of the vitalized intelligibility of the Dunamic-Rational and the subdividable Habitat since these individuals are subdivisions of an omnipresent reality.
The centerpiece for the new school will be a multipurpose room sized to house large school events and subdividable to accommodate gymnasium activities concurrent with OT/PT, as well as after school and camp programs.
The event took place in 810 Washington Street, a 3,025 s/f subdividable space with loft-like ceilings showing the exposed rail ties.
The transportation market could be more efficient if transportation rights were fully transferable and subdividable as to injection and withdrawal points (Smith et al., 1990).
This, allegedly, is because the mind cannot be thought of as spatial, and the mental is neither measurable, perceptible, nor subdividable. Unfortunately, the reasoning behind these claims depends on a failure to draw the rather important distinction between a mental state and its content.
Scholars have theorized these differences occur because researchers in hard disciplines, such as physics, investigate subdividable problems, whereas researchers in soft disciplines, such as English, explore holistic issues (Lodahl & Gordon, 1972; Becher, 1989).
into two legal lots, says a paucity of subdividable land has pushed area builders to search for already developed parcels large enough to carve out another lot or two.