subduct


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sub·duc·tion

 (səb-dŭk′shən)
n.
A geologic process in which one edge of one crustal plate is forced below the edge of another.

[French, from Latin subductus, past participle of subdūcere, to draw away from below : sub-, sub- + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·duct′ v.
sub·duc′tal (-təl) adj.

subduct

(səbˈdʌkt)
vb (tr)
1. (Physiology) physiol to draw or turn (the eye, etc) downwards
2. rare to take away; deduct
[C17: from Latin subdūcere, from sub- + dūcere to lead, bring]

sub•duct

(səbˈdʌkt)

v.t.
1. to cause the subduction of.
2. Archaic. to take away.
v.i.
3. to undergo subduction.
[1565–75; < Latin subductus, past participle of subdūcere to draw up, withdraw =sub- sub- + dūcere to lead]

subduct


Past participle: subducted
Gerund: subducting

Imperative
subduct
subduct
Present
I subduct
you subduct
he/she/it subducts
we subduct
you subduct
they subduct
Preterite
I subducted
you subducted
he/she/it subducted
we subducted
you subducted
they subducted
Present Continuous
I am subducting
you are subducting
he/she/it is subducting
we are subducting
you are subducting
they are subducting
Present Perfect
I have subducted
you have subducted
he/she/it has subducted
we have subducted
you have subducted
they have subducted
Past Continuous
I was subducting
you were subducting
he/she/it was subducting
we were subducting
you were subducting
they were subducting
Past Perfect
I had subducted
you had subducted
he/she/it had subducted
we had subducted
you had subducted
they had subducted
Future
I will subduct
you will subduct
he/she/it will subduct
we will subduct
you will subduct
they will subduct
Future Perfect
I will have subducted
you will have subducted
he/she/it will have subducted
we will have subducted
you will have subducted
they will have subducted
Future Continuous
I will be subducting
you will be subducting
he/she/it will be subducting
we will be subducting
you will be subducting
they will be subducting
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been subducting
you have been subducting
he/she/it has been subducting
we have been subducting
you have been subducting
they have been subducting
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been subducting
you will have been subducting
he/she/it will have been subducting
we will have been subducting
you will have been subducting
they will have been subducting
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been subducting
you had been subducting
he/she/it had been subducting
we had been subducting
you had been subducting
they had been subducting
Conditional
I would subduct
you would subduct
he/she/it would subduct
we would subduct
you would subduct
they would subduct
Past Conditional
I would have subducted
you would have subducted
he/she/it would have subducted
we would have subducted
you would have subducted
they would have subducted
References in periodicals archive ?
Indonesia sits on the Pacific Ring of Fire, where active volcanoes are concentrated and tectonic plates meet and subduct, making it a disaster-prone area with frequent earthquakes.
Using compressed air in pre-installed micro ducts, the cable can accommodate more fibres in a given subduct and can be blown up to 2km for long distance links.
It is one of the 127 active volcanoes -- a third of the world's total -- that dot the Indonesian archipelago, and is part of the Pacific Ring of Fire, where several tectonic plates meet and subduct, frequently triggering earthquakes and volcanic activity.
8).At the same time, the Paleo-Tethys began to subduct beneath southern Eurasia and this event resulted in the formation of an active continental margin with associated magmatism.
Another frightening unknown involves "asperities" - parts of the plates that don't subduct evenly.
Next the researchers simulated how plates might subduct at various mantle temperatures.
These plates bump and grind past one another, diverge from one another, or collide or sink (subduct) along the plate boundary zones of the world.
He also estimates that it was much harder to subduct new crust on Mars.
Thermal arguments suggest that at some point in the distant past, plate tectonics may not have been able to keep pace with the required rate of heat loss (e.g., Davies, 1992, 1999) for the simple reason that oceanic lithosphere, on reaching a nearby trench, was on average too young (hence too buoyant to subduct), and too thin (and hence less capable of cooling the mantle).
Meade, however, says that if deep-focus earthquakes are generated by the role of hydrous minerals, then plates "may easily subduct into the lower mantle." Quakes stop at 690 km, e suggests, because by the time the slabs reach that depth, the heat of the mantle has driven all water out of the minerals.