subduction zone


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subduction zone

n
(Geological Science) geology a long narrow, often arcuate, zone along which subduction takes place

sub·duc·tion zone

(səb-dŭk′shən)
A convergent plate boundary where one plate sinks (subducts) beneath the other, usually because it is denser. See more at tectonic boundary.
References in periodicals archive ?
They suggest that as the slab sank into the mantle, the subduction zone rolled back into the Australian plate as it migrated northwards.
Some areas studied are medium P/T metamorphism in a subduction zone, computational simulation of geological phenomena using particle simulation methods, fault-related carbonate rocks and earthquake indicators, and the tectonic relationship between the course change of the Yangtze River and the Indo-Asia Collision.
Namely near a rumbling volcano, in a tropical river floodplain during a heavy rain, or in the deep sea, far from a tectonic subduction zone.
OSU is planning to place a $50 million marine science building in an area near Newport that is known to be subject to periodic inundation by tsunamis, despite warnings by the state geologist and despite the fact that the university's own researchers are leading authorities on the periodic massive earthquakes along the Cascadia Subduction Zone and the tsunamis that follow.
Findings showed the main indicators of a giant earthquake was how the plate overlies the subduction zone, the stress placed on the zone, the dip angle, the curvature of the plate boundary and how fast it moves.
The Cascadia subduction zone, which stretches from northern California to Vancouver Island, has not experienced a major seismic event since it ruptured in 1700, an 8.
26 m rupture slip due to this earthquake and fixing the source area within Makaran Subduction Zone i.
The two earthquakes were caused by ruptures on adjacent segments of the same fault, which is located off the west coast of Sumatra in a subduction zone where the oceanic Indo-Australian plate is being forced beneath the continental Eurasian plate at a rate of about 4.
In this lavishly illustrated collection of nearly two dozen overviews and topical studies, researchers describe the region's tectonic evolution in the Kamchatka-Aleutian connection, the evolution of the Kurile-Kamchatkan volcanic arcs and dynamics of the Kamchatka-Aleutian junction, the origin of the modern subduction zone, seismic characteristics of the region, and volcanism in the late Pleistocene-Holocene era, with topic studies including imagery, magnetic and seismic constraints, reflective layers, spatial relationships, geochemistry, deformation patterns, and preliminary studies of a volcano on the region's Kuril Islands.
A 200-kilometer-long, 500-meter-thick layer of rocks now lying high in the mountains of Italy is recognized as the remains of an erosive subduction zone that was active under the sea millions of years ago, scientists say.