subduction

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sub·duc·tion

 (səb-dŭk′shən)
n.
A geologic process in which one edge of one crustal plate is forced below the edge of another.

[French, from Latin subductus, past participle of subdūcere, to draw away from below : sub-, sub- + dūcere, to lead; see deuk- in Indo-European roots.]

sub·duct′ v.
sub·duc′tal (-təl) adj.

subduction

(səbˈdʌkʃən)
n
1. (Physiology) the act of subducting, esp of turning the eye downwards
2. (Geological Science) geology the process of one tectonic plate sliding under another, resulting in tensions and faulting in the earth's crust, with earthquakes and volcanic eruptions

sub•duc•tion

(səbˈdʌk ʃən)

n.
the process by which collision of the earth's crustal plates results in one plate's being drawn down or overridden by another, localized along the juncture (subduc′tion zone`) of two plates.
[1965–70; < French subduction (1951); see subduct, -ion]

subduction

The sinking of one lithospheric plate’s leading edge below another lithospheric plate. This occurs below deep ocean trenches.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subduction - a geological process in which one edge of a crustal plate is forced sideways and downward into the mantle below another plate
geologic process, geological process - (geology) a natural process whereby geological features are modified
Translations
subduction
References in periodicals archive ?
The northward Philippine Sea plate subducts under the Japanese Islands along the Nankai Trough and the Sagami Trough (see Fig.
The earthquakes are explained by the tectonic setting of Central America, the Cocos plate subducts underneath the North American Plate at about 7-8 cm a year, making Mexico a seismically active region.
For central Costa Rica, where the seamount segment of the Cocos plate subducts, local earthquake seismic tomography data by Husen et al.
The Philippine archipelago is sandwiched in between two opposite subduction zones - that of the Eurasian Plate (South China Plate) which subducts (is forced under) Luzon along the Manila Trench and that of the Philippine Sea Plate that subducts toward the west along the East Luzon Trench.
As two massive plates push against each other, one plate subducts, or slides, under the other, pushing material from the crust down into the mantle.
The plate boundary offshore of Colombia is also characterized by convergence, where the Nazca plate subducts beneath South America towards the east at a rate of approximately 65 mm/yr.