subeconomy

subeconomy

(ˈsʌbɪˌkɒnəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
an economy within another economy
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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2018) (noting that the subeconomy of Airbnb is made up primarily of
The firm as a subeconomy. Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, 15(1), 74-102.
The intuition for the proof of the Proposition runs as follows: The set of individuals is divided into two groups and an intermediate equilibrium is constructed by local prices that are equal to the market clearing prices when each group is considered separately as a subeconomy. Since market clearing prevails for both subeconomies, overall market clearing is also guaranteed.
And immigration, legal as well as illegal, has created a multibillion-dollar subeconomy of immigration lawyers, lobbyists, activists, and so forth.
They are interstitial in their colour coding, as a class, as a subeconomy, and in their communicative function.
(163.) See Bengt Holmstrom, The Firm as a Subeconomy, 15 J.L.
promoted."); see also Bengt Holmstrom, The Firm as a Subeconomy, 15
1995: Islamic economics and the Islamic subeconomy. Journal of Economic Perspectives 9: 185-173.
The firm as a subeconomy. Journal of Law, Economics and Organization, 15(1), 74-102.
The Islamic subeconomy enables these newcomers to establish business relationships with a diverse pool of ambitious, hard-working, but culturally handicapped people, who like themselves, are excluded from the economic mainstream.
transactions and an entire subeconomy of "peer production and
(1995) Islamic Economics and the Islamic Subeconomy. Journal of Economic Perspectives 9:4, 155-173.