subeconomy

subeconomy

(ˈsʌbɪˌkɒnəmɪ)
n, pl -mies
an economy within another economy
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And immigration, legal as well as illegal, has created a multibillion-dollar subeconomy of immigration lawyers, lobbyists, activists, and so forth.
They are interstitial in their colour coding, as a class, as a subeconomy, and in their communicative function.
See Bengt Holmstrom, The Firm as a Subeconomy, 15 J.
1995: Islamic economics and the Islamic subeconomy.
The Islamic subeconomy enables these newcomers to establish business relationships with a diverse pool of ambitious, hard-working, but culturally handicapped people, who like themselves, are excluded from the economic mainstream.
transactions and an entire subeconomy of "peer production and
777, 793 (1972); Bengt Holmstrom, The Firm as a Subeconomy, 15 J.
Our trusts represent industries that have an extra element of growth because the GDP [gross domestic product] of the African American subeconomy is growing faster than the GDP of the general public," Washington says.
While it is essential to begin this exploration of economic alternatives, it is equally necessary to defend past gains and for those in the subeconomy to find new ways of survival.
To understand why this parasitic subeconomy grows and grows, ascend some steps in the spiral logic of lobbying.