subentry

(redirected from subentries)

sub·en·try

 (sŭb′ĕn′trē)
n. pl. sub·en·tries
An entry, such as one in an account or reference work, that is included within a main entry.

subentry

n, pl -entries
(Accounting & Book-keeping) a secondary entry listed under or as part of a main entry
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References in periodicals archive ?
So, right then and there, onstage, she consulted the dictionarySchaechter-Viswanath and Paul Glasser's new Yiddish/English dictionary, a historic, comprehensive reference work with nearly 50,000 entries and 33,000 subentries that was released shortly before Yiddish Vokhand found the correct word: kandl-tzuker.
Mass media receives explicit attention through entries and subentries about radio, recording industry, sound recordings, the Internet, and media materials.
Also, headwords in the dictionary are not written in bold (despite the fact that they are in bold in the finder lists), capitalized, or made to stand out from subentries in any way and can only be discerned from the linear ordering of elements.
Moreover, there are four overview articles: "Afghanistan," "the Alevis," "the Arab-Israeli Conflict," and "Hamas"--which count as the first of the two subentries of their respective essays.
From the data obtained with collocates, important multi-word terms (prospective subentries of the term abrasion) were preliminarily identified, namely: abrasion finish, abrasion by sandblast, abrasion resistance classification, abrasion resistance test, abrasion hardness and abrasion hardness test amongst others.
The dictionary has separated proclitic prepositions and preposition clusters occurring with nouns into subentries and individual lexemes.
Two other subentries are given, the intransitive verb be-kesong "bernapas" (to breathe) and an abstract noun peng-kesong "pernafasan" (respiration).
The index, while generally quite detailed (eleven subentries for "dance"), provides no entry for "vestment," although official complaints about clerical dress are cited in a number of chapters.
Multiple meanings for identical forms are distinguished in the dictionary; homonymy is identified by numbering at headword level and polysemy is indicated through numbering of subentries under the headword.
Long entries on key topics such as Blues, Concert Music Composers, Jazz, Rap Music, and others contain numerous subentries.
There are no subentries, and long strings of page numbers on major topics--on one page, polyphony, printing, Protestantism, and psalm--are not helpful.
Many entries include subentries extending to as many as four levels.