subhead


Also found in: Thesaurus, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

sub·head

 (sŭb′hĕd′)
n.
1. The heading or title of a subdivision of a printed subject.
2. A subordinate heading or title. In both senses also called subheading.

sub•head

(ˈsʌbˌhɛd)

also sub′head`ing,



n.
1. a title or heading of a subdivision, as in a chapter, essay, or newspaper article.
2. a subordinate division of a title or heading.
[1580–90]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subhead - a heading of a subdivision of a text
header, heading, head - a line of text serving to indicate what the passage below it is about; "the heading seemed to have little to do with the text"
title - a general or descriptive heading for a section of a written work; "the novel had chapter titles"
Translations

subhead

[ˈsʌbˌhed] subheading [ˈsʌbˌhedɪŋ] Nsubtítulo m
References in periodicals archive ?
The subhead for the section on sildenafil should have read, "Sildenafil increases low sexual functioning ...
tracks subhead Nicole Nordblad looks a name to follow after she got the better of both Moore and Frankie Dettori when staying cool in the closing stages of the 1m maiden to guide Holly Martins to a head success at odds of 20-1.
dummy deck subhead dummy dummy dum subhead dummy dum
A headline and subhead in Thursday's Sports section incorrectly implied that the men's 5,000 meters race would be a steeple event.
"We wanted these ads to provide a seamless transition from headline to visual to subhead to copy.
Paige Williams won for Atlanta its first National Magazine Award in feature writing for her article "You Have Thousands of Angels Around You," which ran in October with the subhead "How one young woman lost her family, survived a war, escaped two continents, and through the kindness of strangers found a lifelong home in Atlanta." The American Society of Magazine Editors award, known as an Ellie, was given to Atlanta for the "stylishness and originality" of Williams's reporting.
The subhead of Howard Kurlz's chronicle of network news intrigue "Reality Show: inside the Last Great Television News War" is fitting in its finality: The book chronicles the past four years of anchor shuffling up to Katie Ceuric's arrival at CBS.
PUT THE HEADLINE TOGETHER WITH THE SUBHEAD, and you have nothing less than the holy grail of modern conservatism.
34), the following sentence under the subhead "Overtime" should have read, "Payments that an employer does not need to factor into the calculation of regular rate include paid leave, pay for unworked time (such as holidays, vacation, sick leave, paid time off), voluntary premium payments (e.g., time and one-half for work after eight hours or on a holiday), on-call pay, callback pay, reporting or show-up pay, idle time pay, awards, gifts, most discretionary bonuses, referral bonuses, benefit payments, and expense reimbursements."
On page 17, the second subhead should read, "Adolescents and Adults (Aged [greater than or equal to] 11 Years)." In Table 11 on page 26, the first sentence of the ([double dagger]) footnote should read, "HIV-infected children should receive IG after exposure to measles and can receive varicella and measles vaccine if CD4+ lymphocyte count is [greater than or equal to] 15%." In the first paragraph on page 29, line 17 should read, "...
In the August 2006 issue, in an article titled "Alaska's Publicly Traded Companies Making Strides" under the subhead "Alaska Communications Systems Group," a product called ACS Wireless Aircard was referred to; AIRCARD[R] is a trademark owned by Sierra Wireless and as such should not be used in a generic manner.