subheading

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sub·head·ing

 (sŭb′hĕd′ĭng)
n.

subheading

(ˈsʌbˌhɛdɪŋ) or

subhead

n
1. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) the heading or title of a subdivision or subsection of a printed work
2. (Printing, Lithography & Bookbinding) a division subordinate to a main heading or title
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subheading - a heading of a subdivision of a text
header, heading, head - a line of text serving to indicate what the passage below it is about; "the heading seemed to have little to do with the text"
title - a general or descriptive heading for a section of a written work; "the novel had chapter titles"
Translations
podnadpis

subheading

sub-heading [ˈsʌbhɛdɪŋ] nsous-titre m

subheading

[ˈsʌbˌhɛdɪŋ] nsottotitolo
References in periodicals archive ?
Same as "First subheads" and indent all material falling under the Second Subhead
(4) Subheads: When the prospect first picked up the letter, they would usually look at the top headline and then scan the letter, reading the subheads to see if the letter is "worth reading." These subheads are too long and could be shortened to something like: "Great Business Checking Choices" and "Maximizing Your Cash Flow."
The bookAEs easy-read b&w layout features chapter-opening key points, many subheads, bullet point lists, and margin space for notes.
The two-column layout offers many subheads, chapter objectives and summaries, learning activities, and sample forms and contracts.
As copy editor, Williams penned cover text, headlines and subheads and proofread copy for the entire print magazine.
All this talk of fonts, subheads, headlines - who needs 'em when you've got the 'belly from the telly' on the team?
OK, don't lose him now--to sustain readership, use subheads. Your postcard's subheadlines create a fascinating but short storyline of brief bits, bullets and bites of boundless bulleted beauty ...
* Subheads. White space above subheads makes them easier to read and clearly indicates the conclusion of one topic and the introduction of a new topic.
Text runs on, black page after black page, broken only by subheads. A color insert helps, as does a cover of sports snapshots, but hardly makes each separate baseball story more initially inviting.
But you can also use text in the form of subheads (some people call them breakheads), callouts (also called readouts or pull quotes), charts, captions, factoids and sidebars.
The earlier sections of the legislation appear to mandate a crackdown on illegal immigration, by employing subheads such as "Border Enforcement," "National Strategy for Border Security," "Document Fraud Detection," etc.