subjectively


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sub·jec·tive

 (səb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Dependent on or taking place in a person's mind rather than the external world: "The sensation of pain is a highly subjective experience that varies by culture as well as by individual temperament and situation" (John Hoberman).
b. Based on a given person's experience, understanding, and feelings; personal or individual: admitted he was making a highly subjective judgment.
2. Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
3. Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.
4. Expressing or bringing into prominence the individuality of the artist or author.
5. Grammar Relating to or being the nominative case.
6. Relating to the real nature of something; essential.

sub·jec′tive·ly adv.
sub·jec′tive·ness, sub′jec·tiv′i·ty (sŭb′jĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adv.1.subjectively - in a subjective way; "you cannot look at these facts subjectively"
objectively - with objectivity; "we must look at the facts objectively"
Translations
ذاتِيّا
subjektivně
szubjektív módon
huglægt
subjektívne
öznel şekilde

subjectively

[səbˈdʒektɪvlɪ] ADVsubjetivamente

subjectively

[səbˈdʒɛktɪvli] advsubjectivement

subjectively

advsubjektiv

subjectively

[səbˈdʒɛktɪvlɪ] advsoggettivamente

subject

(ˈsabdʒikt) adjective
(of countries etc) not independent, but dominated by another power. subject nations.
noun
1. a person who is under the rule of a monarch or a member of a country that has a monarchy etc. We are loyal subjects of the Queen; He is a British subject.
2. someone or something that is talked about, written about etc. We discussed the price of food and similar subjects; What was the subject of the debate?; The teacher tried to think of a good subject for their essay; I've said all I can on that subject.
3. a branch of study or learning in school, university etc. He is taking exams in seven subjects; Mathematics is his best subject.
4. a thing, person or circumstance suitable for, or requiring, a particular kind of treatment, reaction etc. I don't think her behaviour is a subject for laughter.
5. in English, the word(s) representing the person or thing that usually does the action shown by the verb, and with which the verb agrees. The cat sat on the mat; He hit her because she broke his toy; He was hit by the ball.
(səbˈdʒekt) verb
1. to bring (a person, country etc) under control. They have subjected all the neighbouring states (to their rule).
2. to cause to suffer, or submit (to something). He was subjected to cruel treatment; These tyres are subjected to various tests before leaving the factory.
subjection (səbˈdʒekʃən) noun
subjective (səbˈdʒektiv) adjective
(of a person's attitude etc) arising from, or influenced by, his own thoughts and feelings only; not objective or impartial. You must try not to be too subjective if you are on a jury in a court of law.
subˈjectively adverb
subject matter
the subject discussed in an essay, book etc.
change the subject
to start talking about something different. I mentioned the money to her, but she changed the subject.
subject to
1. liable or likely to suffer from or be affected by. He is subject to colds; The programme is subject to alteration.
2. depending on. These plans will be put into practice next week, subject to your approval.
References in classic literature ?
(d) NON-SENSATIONAL ELEMENTS IN PERCEPTION.--When we perceive any object of a familiar kind, much of what appears subjectively to be immediately given is really derived from past experience.
He was, in fact, commanding destiny, subjectively. He did not really care for any of the things of mere earth, he was in the clouds and looked down on all the weaknesses and wants of us poor mortals.
Andrew Caldecott QC, acting for Attorney General Geoffrey Cox, told the Old Bailey Robinson's actions were "subjectively reckless."
Although we loathe finger-pointing when there is a problem, owed to our habitual tendencies to deal with issues subjectively rather than objectively, some of PM Khan's words ring true.
A state jurisdiction exercise through territorial principle is based on territorial boundaries within the state and if a crime happens in more than one country than it would apply subjectively and objectively to apprehend offenders.
Arguments should be responded to objectively and professionally and not subjectively in a predisposed manner.
Previous research suggests that dark chocolate, containing between 70 and 85 per cent cocoa solids, is associated with an improvement in subjectively assessed fatigue in people with chronic fatigue syndrome (ME).
Yet the belief is made widespread that terror is what can force the authorities into doing certain subjectively desired things.
The study also found correlation between what an anesthesia provider subjectively feels using a standard loss-of-resistance syringe and the objective measurements displayed by the CompuFlo instrument when pressure changes, which offers quantifiable confirmation and confidence the epidural space has been properly accessed.
The success or failure of the Pakatan Harapan government in fulfilling the 10 promises in its manifesto within 100 days of its administration needs to decided by the people and would have to be viewed subjectively, said Deputy Communication and Multimedia Minister Eddin Syazlee Shith.
* Use compensations and promotions to make progress measurable and to create "level playing fields" as defined by the "wronged parties." This really means "more for me" and less for everyone else with "justice," again, defined subjectively by one side.
Unlike any other scoring method, Empirix's approach provides a single score, called "QoE Index", that can estimate the overall acceptability of a service as perceived subjectively by the end user, based on passive and, optionally, active measurements.