subjectivism


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sub·jec·tiv·ism

 (səb-jĕk′tə-vĭz′əm)
n.
1. The quality of being subjective.
2.
a. The doctrine that all knowledge is restricted to the conscious self and its sensory states.
b. A theory or doctrine that emphasizes the subjective elements in experience.
3. Any of various theories holding that the only valid standard of judgment is that of the individual. For example, ethical subjectivism holds that individual conscience is the only appropriate standard for moral judgment.

sub·jec′tiv·ist n.
sub·jec′tiv·is′tic adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

subjectivism

(səbˈdʒɛktɪˌvɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the meta-ethical doctrine that there are no absolute moral values but that these are variable in the same way as taste is
2. (Philosophy) any similar philosophical theory, for example, about truth or perception
3. (Theology) any theological theory that attaches primary importance to religious experience
4. the quality or condition of being subjective
subˈjectivist n
subˌjectiˈvistic adj
subˌjectiˈvistically adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sub•jec•tiv•ism

(səbˈdʒɛk təˌvɪz əm)

n.
1. the doctrine that all knowledge is limited to experiences by the self, and that transcendent knowledge is impossible.
2.
a. any of various theories maintaining that moral judgments are statements concerning the emotional or mental reactions of the individual or the community.
b. any of several theories holding that certain states of thought or feeling are the highest good.
[1855–60]
sub•jec′tiv•ist, n.
sub•jec`ti•vis′tic, adj.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

subjectivism

1. Epistemology. the doctrine that all knowledge is limited to experiences by the self and that all transcendent knowledge is impossible.
2. Ethics. the theory that certain states of feeling or thought are the highest good.
3. Ethics. the doctrine that the good and the right can be distinguished only by individual feeling. — subjectivist, n.subjectivistic, adj.
See also: Philosophy
the views and behavior of one who tends to be affected by the emotional qualities of an event, argument, or problem. Also called subjectivity.
See also: Attitudes
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjectivism - (philosophy) the doctrine that knowledge and value are dependent on and limited by your subjective experience
philosophy - the rational investigation of questions about existence and knowledge and ethics
philosophical doctrine, philosophical theory - a doctrine accepted by adherents to a philosophy
2.subjectivism - the quality of being subjective
quality - an essential and distinguishing attribute of something or someone; "the quality of mercy is not strained"--Shakespeare
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

subjectivism

[səbˈdʒektɪvɪzəm] Nsubjetivismo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

subjectivism

Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
"Bog-lights, vapours of mysticism, psychic overtones, soul orgies, wailings among the shadows, weird gnosticisms, veils and tissues of words, gibbering subjectivisms, gropings and maunderings, ontological fantasies, pan-psychic hallucinations--this is the stuff, the phantasms of hope, that fills your bookshelves.
"This is why classical metaphysics and Christian theology are so dangerous [to those who subscribe to this subjectivism] and are met with furious opposition." The multiculturalist's notion that all views of life are equally good and acceptable is a form of this subjectivism with its own consequences.
So the contrast between subjectivism and stance-independence is very stark.
This subjectivism about value has great utility when our focus is merely on satisfying the material needs and wants people actually happen to have.
POLITICAL CHOICEFor it stressed the fact that what masquerades as political choice in our country is really nothing but profound tribal subjectivism.
Mises's insistence on subjectivism in understanding economic choices and his stress on the complexities of market transactions have political lessons to teach.
Crotty delineates four main epistemologies including positivism, objectivism, subjectivism and constructionism.
While Michael Werner discusses many people leading up to postmodernism in "Threads of Humanist History" (Humanism 101, J/A 2018), he gives short shrift to postmodernism itself, calling it "an extreme form of subjectivism and cynicism." He neglects to mention: 1) the incredulity towards modernist narratives of personal and societal emancipation (Jean Francois Lyotard); 2) the cultural moment of multinational capitalism (Fredric Jameson); 3) the deconstruction of binary oppositions (Jacques Derrida); and 4) the real being replaced by signs of the real (Jean Baudrillard).
Godse accused Gandhi of subjectivism and of acting as if only he had a monopoly of the truth.
Among the topics are the psychological roots of cognitive linguistics--and beyond; from signal to symbol to system: the emergence of language; concept, context, and extended embodiment: spatial language and cognitive development; space, time, semiosis, and cognitive artefacts: evidence from an Amazonian culture and language; and beyond subjectivism and objectivism: realism; relativism, and representation.
Many people regard religion as the opposite of, and the antidote to, subjectivism. In fact, however, religion is a form of subjectivism.
Allow me list some of the chapters: 1) Poetry, the Siege Perilous; 4) Mythopoesis; 7) The Metaphysical Uses of Metaphor, Kenning, Riddle and Rune in the Teutonic Tradition; 11) The Dark Side of Poetry: Terence McKenna, DMT, the Techno-Elves, and the Deconstruction of the Human Form; 12) Sufism, Spiritual Romance, and the Union of East and West; 14) An Exegesis of the Prologue to William Blake's The Marriage of Heave and Hell; 16) The City of Byzantium in the Symbology of William Butler Years: 19) The Curse of Poetic Subjectivism.