subjectivity


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sub·jec·tive

 (səb-jĕk′tĭv)
adj.
1.
a. Dependent on or taking place in a person's mind rather than the external world: "The sensation of pain is a highly subjective experience that varies by culture as well as by individual temperament and situation" (John Hoberman).
b. Based on a given person's experience, understanding, and feelings; personal or individual: admitted he was making a highly subjective judgment.
2. Psychology Not caused by external stimuli.
3. Medicine Of, relating to, or designating a symptom or complaint perceived by a patient.
4. Expressing or bringing into prominence the individuality of the artist or author.
5. Grammar Relating to or being the nominative case.
6. Relating to the real nature of something; essential.

sub·jec′tive·ly adv.
sub·jec′tive·ness, sub′jec·tiv′i·ty (sŭb′jĕk-tĭv′ĭ-tē) n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjectivity - judgment based on individual personal impressions and feelings and opinions rather than external facts
sound judgement, sound judgment, perspicacity, judgement, judgment - the capacity to assess situations or circumstances shrewdly and to draw sound conclusions
Translations
subjektiivisuus

subjectivity

[ˌsʌbdʒekˈtɪvɪtɪ] Nsubjetividad f

subjectivity

[ˌsʌbdʒɛkˈtɪvəti] nsubjectivité fsubject matter n [book, lecture, film, painting] → sujet m

subjectivity

References in classic literature ?
(For the sake of schematic simplicity, I am ignoring various complications connected with time, which require some tedious but perfectly feasible elaborations.) Thus what may be called subjectivity in the point of view is not a distinctive peculiarity of mind: it is present just as much in the photographic plate.
Subjectivity may be a falsifying influence, but it may also be an important virtue, adding intimacy, charm, or force.
"The metaphysician reasons deductively out of his own subjectivity. The scientist reasons inductively from the facts of experience.
Tulliver had undertaken to act persuasively, and had failed; a fact which may receive some illustration from the remark of a great philosopher, that fly-fishers fail in preparing their bait so as to make it alluring in the right quarter, for want of a due acquaintance with the subjectivity of fishes.
More specifically, cognitive limitations in the processing of performance information and the inability to verify performance outcomes can create assessment problems that limit the incentive-strengthening role of subjectivity in performance evaluation.
There are two main objectives: one is a theoretical interest that involves examining the issue of subjectivity and how intersubjective negotiations take shape in research encounters.
I am drawn to this task by a sense that the persistent invocation of rational choice in childbirth discussions depends on forms of subjectivity that have been critiqued and challenged by feminist theorists as deeply inadequate.
Lawrence Hogue argues that while post-modern American fiction operates from notions of multiplicity, indeterminacy, fluidity, and incompleteness, major postmodern American male writers such as Thomas Pynchon and Paul Auster often reiterate a Eurocentric male subjectivity in their novels.
Penafiel's art is an attempt to dissect the tensions that contemporary subjectivity entails, and Egolactante has been at the core of that project.
They present new findings and results on such topics as the matrix and multiple layers of inter- subjectivity and empathy; the mirror neurons discovery; from pre-verbal sharing and speech perception to meaning acquisition and verbal inter-subjectivity; and implications and applications of the inter-subjective matrix in therapy, intervention, and music.
Textual Subjectivity: The Encoding of Subjectivity in Medieval Narratives and Lyrics.
Drawing from this tradition, Renov notes that essays combine "descriptive and reflexive modalities" in which representations of the world are "consciously filtered through the flux of subjectivity" (70).