subjectship

subjectship

(ˈsʌbdʒɪktʃɪp)
n
(Government, Politics & Diplomacy) the state of being a subject or citizen
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Instead, Cyprus society became a 'subjectship', with people behaving as subjects who wait for things to happen instead of being part of social action for the good of society.
Birthright citizenship, as Blackstone explains, is a feudal doctrine, the ground of subjectship, not citizenship; it requires perpetual allegiance.
To bolster this argument, which is based primarily on contemporary accounts rather than statistical data, she points out that British officials tried mightily to deter emigration, warning prospective migrants of the imminent collapse of the American republics, banning the departure of skilled mechanics, and defining British subjectship as perpetual, a status that could be dissolved only by treason.
the very idea that nation equates with family, the school trains for subjectship rather than citizenship.
Although the emphasis on unity and the use of the Emperor as the symbol of that unity may seem to suggest 'ethnic' elements in the Meiji Restoration movement, the Japanese 'subjectship' as common, nationwide membership was in fact multiethnic in its character.
'Equality between Four Classes' was used as a slogan, and the new registry created a common Japanese 'subjectship' establishing a direct connection between the people and the government (Fukushima, 1959).(20) The state used the registry for the purposes of conscription and universal compulsory education, both of which were essential components of the policy goals, fukoku-kyohei and kokumin-toitsu.(21)
The Japanese thought they saw the concept they named shutaisei everywhere in Western intellectual discourse: individualism, democracy, liberalism, libertarianism, subject, subjectship, subjectivism, and libertinism flourished without bound." According to Miyoshi's explication, the term that was coined to supplant an apparent lack in the Japanese discourse, and which came to determine a certain foundation of Japanese thinking transposed from a liberal Western humanism, could not, in turn, be returned to and reflected in a Western vocabulary.
The ferocity of rulership and the submission of subjectship in the early state can only be understood if they are seen as the transposition into social life of these unconscious strivings and terrors.
What is the source of the pleasures of rulership and the submission of subjectship that we take for granted?
Blackstone speaks only of "birthright subjectship" or "birthright allegiance," never using the terms citizen or citizenship.
Howard and other leading architects of the Fourteenth Amendment, and characterized the right of expatriation as "a natural and inherent right of all people, indispensable to the enjoyment of the rights of life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness." Like the idea of citizenship, this right of expatriation is wholly incompatible with the common law understanding of perpetual allegiance and subjectship. One member of the House of Representatives expressed the general sense of the Congress when he proclaimed: "The old feudal doctrine stated by Blackstone and adopted as part of the common law of England ...