subjugation


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Related to subjugation: reciprocate

sub·ju·gate

 (sŭb′jə-gāt′)
tr.v. sub·ju·gat·ed, sub·ju·gat·ing, sub·ju·gates
1. To bring under control, especially by military force; conquer.
2. To make subordinate or subject to the dominion of something else: "The urgency of the mating season is subjugated, for the moment, to the demands of self-preservation" (David M. Carroll).

[Middle English subjugaten, from Latin subiugāre, subiugāt- : sub-, sub- + iugum, yoke; see yeug- in Indo-European roots.]

sub′ju·ga′tion n.
sub′ju·ga′tor n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjugation - forced submission to control by others
relationship - a state involving mutual dealings between people or parties or countries
repression - a state of forcible subjugation; "the long repression of Christian sects"
oppression - the state of being kept down by unjust use of force or authority: "after years of oppression they finally revolted"
enslavement, captivity - the state of being a slave; "So every bondman in his own hand bears the power to cancel his captivity"--Shakespeare
slavery, thraldom, thrall, thralldom, bondage - the state of being under the control of another person
bondage - the state of being under the control of a force or influence or abstract power; "he was in bondage to fear:; "he sought release from his bondage to Satan"; "a self freed from the bondage of time"
peonage - the condition of a peon
confinement - the state of being confined; "he was held in confinement"
2.subjugation - the act of subjugating by cruelty; "the tyrant's oppression of the people"
persecution - the act of persecuting (especially on the basis of race or religion)
3.subjugation - the act of conqueringsubjugation - the act of conquering    
capture, gaining control, seizure - the act of forcibly dispossessing an owner of property
Translations

subjugation

[ˌsʌbdʒʊˈgeɪʃən] Nsubyugación f
to live in subjugationvivir subyugado

subjugation

nUnterwerfung f
References in classic literature ?
When from dark error's subjugation My words of passionate exhortation Had wrenched thy fainting spirit free; And writhing prone in thine affliction Thou didst recall with malediction The vice that had encompassed thee: And when thy slumbering conscience, fretting By recollection's torturing flame, Thou didst reveal the hideous setting Of thy life's current ere I came: When suddenly I saw thee sicken, And weeping, hide thine anguished face, Revolted, maddened, horror-stricken, At memories of foul disgrace.
It was explained to them as being a friendly arrangement and transfer, but they shook their heads grimly, and considered it an act of subjugation of their ancient allies.
In describing a war or the subjugation of a people, a general historian looks for the cause of the event not in the power of one man, but in the interaction of many persons connected with the event.
'Well, I should think one conquest would be enough; and too much, unless the subjugation were mutual.'
This love was a torment, and he resented bitterly the subjugation in which it held him; he was a prisoner and he longed for freedom.
Subjugation meant death, for no quarter was given, and they fought heroically to the last man.*
Big thoughts were the Prince's; and it was always with a shake of his head that he considered the subjugation of the world to the arbitrary measures of Time.
The whole world will be intelligent, educated, and co-operating; things will move faster and faster towards the subjugation of Nature.
Her little arts to effect his subjugation were too subtle and impalpable to attract my observation; but I thought there was a certain refined affectation of superiority, and an ungenial self-consciousness about her, that negatived all her advantages; and after she was gone, Rose interpreted to me her various looks, words, and actions with a mingled acuteness and asperity that made me wonder, equally, at the lady's artifice and my sister's penetration, and ask myself if she too had an eye to the squire - but never mind, Halford; she had not.
It was his ceaseless domination over her, the utter subjugation of her will, her complete lack of freedom.
The spear-hand paused, the black cast a quick glance in the direction of the disturbance, as did the others of the blacks who were not occupied with the subjugation of the ape-man.
He saw the world of civilization then more plainly than ever he had seen it before; a world in which nothing counted but brutal might, an order devised by those who possessed it for the subjugation of those who did not.