subjunctive


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Related to subjunctive: Present Subjunctive

subjunctive mood

The subjunctive mood refers to verbs that are used to describe hypothetical or non-real actions, events, or situations. This is in comparison to the indicative mood, which is used to express factual, non-hypothetical information.
We most commonly use the subjunctive mood to express desires or wishes; to express commands, suggestions, requests, or statements of necessity; or to describe hypothetical outcomes that depend on certain conditions.
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sub·junc·tive

 (səb-jŭngk′tĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a mood of a verb used in some languages for contingent or hypothetical action, action viewed subjectively, or grammatically subordinate statements.
n.
1. The subjunctive mood.
2. A subjunctive construction. See Usage Note at if.

[Late Latin subiūnctīvus, from Latin subiūnctus, past participle of subiungere, to subjoin, subordinate (translation of Greek hupotaktikos, subordinate, subjunctive); see subjoin.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

subjunctive

(səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv)
adj
(Grammar) grammar denoting a mood of verbs used when the content of the clause is being doubted, supposed, feared true, etc, rather than being asserted. The rules for its use and the range of meanings it may possess vary considerably from language to language. In the following sentence, were is in the subjunctive: I'd think very seriously about that if I were you. Compare indicative
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the subjunctive mood
b. a verb in this mood
Abbreviation: subj
[C16: via Late Latin subjunctīvus, from Latin subjungere to subjoin]
subˈjunctively adv
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sub•junc•tive

(səbˈdʒʌŋk tɪv)
adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical mood typically used for subjective, doubtful, hypothetical, or grammatically subordinate statements or questions, as the mood of be in if this be treason. Compare imperative (def. 3), indicative (def. 2).
n.
2. the subjunctive mood.
3. a verb form in the subjunctive mood.
[1520–30; < Late Latin subjunctīvus= Latin subjunct(us), past participle of subjungere to harness, subjoin (sub- sub- + jungere to join) + -īvus -ive]
sub•junc′tive•ly, adv.
usage: The subjunctive mood has largely disappeared in English. It survives, though inconsistently, in sentences with conditional clauses contrary to fact and in subordinate clauses after verbs like wish: If the house were nearer to the road, we would hear more traffic noise. I wish I were in Florida. The subjunctive also occurs in subordinate that clauses after a main clause expressing recommendation, resolution, demand, etc.: We ask that each tenant take (not takes) responsibility for keeping the front door locked. It is important that only fresh spinach be (not is) used. The subjunctive occurs too in some established or idiomatic expressions: So be it. Heaven help us. God rest ye merry, gentlemen.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

subjunctive

A form of a verb that expresses a doubt, condition, supposition, or contingency, for example, “were” in “If I were you I’d wait a while.”
Dictionary of Unfamiliar Words by Diagram Group Copyright © 2008 by Diagram Visual Information Limited
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjunctive - a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
modality, mood, mode - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
Adj.1.subjunctive - relating to a mood of verbs; "subjunctive verb endings"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

subjunctive

[səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv]
A. ADJsubjuntivo
subjunctive moodmodo m subjuntivo
B. Nsubjuntivo m
the verb is in the subjunctiveel verbo está en subjuntivo
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

subjunctive

[səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv]
adjsubjonctif/ive
nsubjonctif m
in the subjunctive → au subjonctif
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

subjunctive

adjkonjunktivisch; the subjunctive verb/mood/formder Konjunktiv
n (= mood, verb)Konjunktiv m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

subjunctive

[səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv] (Gram)
1. adjcongiuntivo/a
2. ncongiuntivo
in the subjunctive → al congiuntivo
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995
References in classic literature ?
"The subjunctive mood, past perfect tense of the verb `to know.'"
Miss Dearborn had not thought of it before, but on reflection she believed the subjunctive mood was a "sad" one and "if" rather a sorry "part of speech."
"Give me some more examples of the subjunctive, Rebecca, and that will do for this afternoon," she said.
She thought it good for them to see that she could make an excellent lather while she corrected their blunders "without looking,"-- that a woman with her sleeves tucked up above her elbows might know all about the Subjunctive Mood or the Torrid Zone--that, in short, she might possess "education" and other good things ending in "tion," and worthy to be pronounced emphatically, without being a useless doll.
The modal-aspectual prefix ba- (with varying vowel) marks the imperative, subjunctive present, preterite, past participle, and infinitive.
In fact, however, the difference between Mill's indicative est and Bacon's subjunctive sit does not have the force that the footnote attributes to it.
He told co-writer Bieber, 22, the lyric "If I was your boyfriend" had "clearly used the subjunctive mood incorrectly" and "the correct lyrics should, in fact, be 'If I were your boyfriend'."
The apodosis of remote conditional constructions may express the hypothetical consequence by means of a past subjunctive in Old and Middle English (Visser 1966: [section] 861).
In addition, I make the case that one reason why Lovecraft fandom in particular has grown so dramatically in recent years is that such subjunctive "as-if" world making ultimately blurs the boundaries between groups of "geeks" who bond through popular culture and recognized religious communities that traditionally have performed the same kind of functions for their followers.
[were to ring is in the subjunctive mood; the bell is unlikely to ring] This form of the subjective mood uses were in all cases, singular or plural: I were (not was), you were, he/she/it were (not was), we were, you were, they were.