subjunctive

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subjunctive mood

The subjunctive mood refers to verbs that are used to describe hypothetical or non-real actions, events, or situations. This is in comparison to the indicative mood, which is used to express factual, non-hypothetical information.
We most commonly use the subjunctive mood to express desires or wishes; to express commands, suggestions, requests, or statements of necessity; or to describe hypothetical outcomes that depend on certain conditions.
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sub·junc·tive

 (səb-jŭngk′tĭv)
adj.
Of, relating to, or being a mood of a verb used in some languages for contingent or hypothetical action, action viewed subjectively, or grammatically subordinate statements.
n.
1. The subjunctive mood.
2. A subjunctive construction. See Usage Note at if.

[Late Latin subiūnctīvus, from Latin subiūnctus, past participle of subiungere, to subjoin, subordinate (translation of Greek hupotaktikos, subordinate, subjunctive); see subjoin.]

subjunctive

(səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv)
adj
(Grammar) grammar denoting a mood of verbs used when the content of the clause is being doubted, supposed, feared true, etc, rather than being asserted. The rules for its use and the range of meanings it may possess vary considerably from language to language. In the following sentence, were is in the subjunctive: I'd think very seriously about that if I were you. Compare indicative
n
(Grammar) grammar
a. the subjunctive mood
b. a verb in this mood
Abbreviation: subj
[C16: via Late Latin subjunctīvus, from Latin subjungere to subjoin]
subˈjunctively adv

sub•junc•tive

(səbˈdʒʌŋk tɪv)
adj.
1. of or designating a grammatical mood typically used for subjective, doubtful, hypothetical, or grammatically subordinate statements or questions, as the mood of be in if this be treason. Compare imperative (def. 3), indicative (def. 2).
n.
2. the subjunctive mood.
3. a verb form in the subjunctive mood.
[1520–30; < Late Latin subjunctīvus= Latin subjunct(us), past participle of subjungere to harness, subjoin (sub- sub- + jungere to join) + -īvus -ive]
sub•junc′tive•ly, adv.
usage: The subjunctive mood has largely disappeared in English. It survives, though inconsistently, in sentences with conditional clauses contrary to fact and in subordinate clauses after verbs like wish: If the house were nearer to the road, we would hear more traffic noise. I wish I were in Florida. The subjunctive also occurs in subordinate that clauses after a main clause expressing recommendation, resolution, demand, etc.: We ask that each tenant take (not takes) responsibility for keeping the front door locked. It is important that only fresh spinach be (not is) used. The subjunctive occurs too in some established or idiomatic expressions: So be it. Heaven help us. God rest ye merry, gentlemen.

subjunctive

A form of a verb that expresses a doubt, condition, supposition, or contingency, for example, “were” in “If I were you I’d wait a while.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subjunctive - a mood that represents an act or state (not as a fact but) as contingent or possible
modality, mood, mode - verb inflections that express how the action or state is conceived by the speaker
Adj.1.subjunctive - relating to a mood of verbs; "subjunctive verb endings"
grammar - the branch of linguistics that deals with syntax and morphology (and sometimes also deals with semantics)
Translations

subjunctive

[səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv]
A. ADJsubjuntivo
subjunctive moodmodo m subjuntivo
B. Nsubjuntivo m
the verb is in the subjunctiveel verbo está en subjuntivo

subjunctive

[səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv]
adjsubjonctif/ive
nsubjonctif m
in the subjunctive → au subjonctif

subjunctive

adjkonjunktivisch; the subjunctive verb/mood/formder Konjunktiv
n (= mood, verb)Konjunktiv m

subjunctive

[səbˈdʒʌŋktɪv] (Gram)
1. adjcongiuntivo/a
2. ncongiuntivo
in the subjunctive → al congiuntivo
References in classic literature ?
The subjunctive mood, past perfect tense of the verb `to know.
Miss Dearborn had not thought of it before, but on reflection she believed the subjunctive mood was a "sad" one and "if" rather a sorry "part of speech.
Give me some more examples of the subjunctive, Rebecca, and that will do for this afternoon," she said.
She thought it good for them to see that she could make an excellent lather while she corrected their blunders "without looking,"-- that a woman with her sleeves tucked up above her elbows might know all about the Subjunctive Mood or the Torrid Zone--that, in short, she might possess "education" and other good things ending in "tion," and worthy to be pronounced emphatically, without being a useless doll.
Presumably, the author of the note has remembered that subjunctives are used in Latin to express potential facts or states of affairs, as English does with modal auxiliary verbs like 'could,' 'would,' or 'may,' but has either forgotten that this is only one of many uses of the subjunctive or simply has not bothered to go look at the passage in Bacon to see how he uses it there.
Moderate realist" theorists, such as Lewis and Stalnaker, admit that subjunctives are context-relative and often indeterminate.
Celia is a stickler for grammar, and it's hard to keep up with her subjunctives, past participles, et al.
All Indo-European subjunctives became futures in Latin, or, to put it in the reverse form, no Latin subjunctive comes from an Indo-European subjunctive" (1953: 70-73).
This prison/ has stolen my subjunctives, my roar and/ lungs--think if a hunter cut your tongue.
But I do sense a slight hysteria and some overpitched claims in the book's fourteen essays, some of which are heavily dependent on subjunctives, on what may or could possibly have happened.
This paper pursues the analysis of finiteness and subjunctives in English proposed in Anderson (2001b), in the context of the approach to finiteness adopted in Anderson (1997, 2001a, 2006b, 2007).
The contrast in stress between TB tarko /tsrk-d-wa/ < PT * te-terk-o-we and TB Class I and V ablauting subjunctives, e.