subletter

subletter

(sʌbˈlɛtə)
n
(Commerce) a person who sublets
References in periodicals archive ?
Gainsborough is an artist 'alert to the main chance': a canny subletter of properties; a man who married a woman--Margaret, the illegitimate daughter of the Duke of Beaufort--with a settlement of 200 [pounds sterling] a year; and an adaptable flatterer of his sitters.
If a response covers more than one page, the paragraph number and subletter should be repeated at the top of the next page.
The owner, not the subletter, would be held legally responsible for any lodgers caught during periodic city inspections (1912, 72-75).
Multiple cheques payable to a fraudulent subletter or fraudulent property management company would only help to mitigate the tenant's loss, on the assumption that the fraudster will abscond before cashing all of the rental cheques," said Jerry Parks, partner at law firm Taylor Wessing.
A subletter saw her one summer watching calmly over
Others circumvent the rules because they need money right away, and getting a subletter approved by the co-op board can take months, Shmulewitz said.
Grenfell sublet amnesty FRESH efforts to pin down the true death toll of the Grenfell Tower tragedy have begun with an offer of legal protection for its subletters.
Parra said Jaffee put signs on the backs of the front doors of the apartments warning the subletters not to open the door to anyone, and even had a photo of Parra, who he knew was after him.
Even a couple thousand dollars worth of additional fees probably isn't going to derail a sale, but rising fees can certainly cause renters and subletters to reconsider.
That afternoon, Ann, her sister Lois, Lois' daughter Lilli and Mark O'Ferrall all arrived to help me clean and prepare my apartment, as I would have subletters stay there for the duration I was going to be away.