subletter

subletter

(sʌbˈlɛtə)
n
(Commerce) a person who sublets
References in periodicals archive ?
I'd written the novella, The Subletter, and wanted to give it a home.
Gainsborough is an artist 'alert to the main chance': a canny subletter of properties; a man who married a woman--Margaret, the illegitimate daughter of the Duke of Beaufort--with a settlement of 200 [pounds sterling] a year; and an adaptable flatterer of his sitters.
It is also helpful to cite the paragraph number, subletter, and repeat the text of the requirement as it appears in the RFP.
The owner, not the subletter, would be held legally responsible for any lodgers caught during periodic city inspections (1912, 72-75).
Besides, where will the bachelors go with rents skyrocketing once again?" said a subletter in Bur Dubai.
A subletter saw her one summer watching calmly over
An agent of the New Haven Board of Education in the 1870s attributed the failure of enforcement to the complicity of manufacturers willing to look the other way while work was jobbed out to the lowest bidder, often a "subletter" employing child workers:
"Multiple cheques payable to a fraudulent subletter or fraudulent property management company would only help to mitigate the tenant's loss, on the assumption that the fraudster will abscond before cashing all of the rental cheques," said Jerry Parks, partner at law firm Taylor Wessing.
Others circumvent the rules because they need money right away, and getting a subletter approved by the co-op board can take months, Shmulewitz said.
The technology firm provides apartment renters a platform to list available space for subleasing and find subletters. Benjamin Waller and Mark Tergesen at ABS Partners represented the building owner, 357 Grand LLC, and Samantha Fishbone at the Squarefoot acted on behalf of the tenant in this deal.