subliterary


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Related to subliterary: sublet, sunlit

sub·lit·er·ar·y

 (sŭb-lĭt′ə-rĕr′ē)
adj.
1. Of, relating to, having the qualities of, or producing subliterature.
2. Not written as or intended to be literature: subliterary works such as office memoranda.

subliterary

(sʌbˈlɪtərərɪ)
adj
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) not intended as literature
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.subliterary - not written as or intended to be literature; "subliterary works such as letters and diaries"
informal - used of spoken and written language
References in periodicals archive ?
purging, and drinking alone in the one bedroom, un-air conditioned apartment she rents with her boyfriend--the subliterary brute who works at a beach hamburger shack down the road from our treatment center.
From those subliterary and sub-journalistic milieus sprang Rohmer's imaginings of Fu Manchu.
epitaph as "subliterary" (386), arguing that the English
The same period whose ascendant ideology of authorial originality demoted the cento to subliterary status is that whose fraught copyright regime cultivated the revival of this and similar appropriative genres (St Clair 135).
Both of them he sees on a continuum of subliterary genres that can also include the tales of robbery or magic in the Met.
Working within a tradition of literary criticism, Leech also describes advertising language as a "subliterary" genre, arguing that, as in literature, the advertisement writer often relies on unexpected strategies of novel and creative exploitation of language within predictable linguistic patterns and techniques.
To revisit this cherishing of the everyday, the subliterary, the historical, and the cultural, is to discover that Zola is, or was, already there.
That is, Hawthorne's works for children were trivialized as subliterary at the same moment that many of his other works were authorized and endorsed by scholars in central ways.
James, Ruth Rendell, Ian Rankin, and Michael Connolly relegated to a category that is considered "subliterary"?
Delano's "mechanics of repression," to use Sundquist's phrase, repress the discourse of embodiment, displacing it onto "an absent or moody mind" and thus codifying an objectivist reading practice that understood the body as only an object and its language as a non-language, and thus subliterary.
Today, we call these readers fans, and they happily devour and endorse both literary and subliterary texts so long as they provide a satisfyingly Gothic experience.