subliterate

sub·lit·er·ate

 (sŭb-lĭt′ər-ĭt)
adj.
1. Not interested in or able to read artistic literature.
2. Of, relating to, or being language that is dialectal, slangy, or full of jargon.

subliterate

(sʌbˈlɪtərət)
adj
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) not fully literate or not interested in literature
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) of language that is incorrect or contains slang
References in periodicals archive ?
(I appreciate also the extra-legal education that George provided--for example, letting the class know that "irregardless," a word used in an excerpted case, is a subliterate substitute for "regardless." [I later heard George say many times in Business Planning: "Regardless, or, as they say in New Jersey, irregardless." I regularly said to George that he needed to explain his point to the class.
Patterson (http://www.nytimes.com/2010/01/24/magazine/24patterson-t.html) divides opinion : Stephen King describes his work as "terrible", reviewers have deemed it "subliterate"; yet in 2015 he received the (http://www.nationalbook.org/literarian.html) National Book Foundation's Literarian Award for his philanthropic efforts in encouraging Americans to read.
In his influential 1939 essay "Avant-Garde and Kitsch," Clement Greenberg enunciated a vision of the modernist project very much in line with the one described by Fluyssen, while denigrating comic books self-evidently as "kitsch," a form of "pre-digested" culture intended for children or subliterate audiences (39).
For more than a year after I publicly announced in June 2010 that I would begin chemotherapy for esophageal cancer, the stupidest of the faithful either gloated on their subliterate Web sites that my illness was a sign of "God's revenge" for having blasphemed their Lord and Master, or prayed that I would abandon my contempt for their nonsensical beliefs by undergoing a deathbed conversion.
The recent work Study for a Subliterate Manifesto (2007) shows Poppelwell feeling his way through the creation of a dinner service.
Meanwhile, as we charge forward into the technological age, the question of whether or not books and newspapers will even exist in ten years gives a subliterate public further fallacious reasons for downsizing the babies with the bathwater in a variety of industries tied to "old fashioned" publication.
Yet over the years, Rand's writing has been routinely dismissed as juvenile and subliterate when it has been considered at all.
This type of content generation, this method of "writing," is not only subliterate, it may actually undermine the literary impulse.
He describes Maya Angelou's contribution to Bill Clinton's first big day as "gassy drivel," and Elizabeth Alexander's role in Barack Obama's inauguration as "the monotonous, structureless, subliterate whining of nursed and petted victimhood." Derbyshire's conclusion about American high culture is that it is arid, academic in the worst sense, and completely devoid of imagination.
Mailer throughout argues convincingly for Oswald's intelligence, in spite of the man's subliterate journals and correspondence.
It is perhaps appropriate in our current cultural stupor - subliterate, sport-crazed, and celebrity-obsessed (and I use 'obsessed' in its root sense of 'besieged') - that we should choose as our idol the totem of the terraces.
In the local microcosm, the cult of xenophobia has its parallels in the paranoid dread of new democratic generations as subliterate media savages.