subliterature


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sub·lit·er·a·ture

 (sŭb′lĭt′ər-cho͝or′, -chər)
n.
Writings, such as romance novels and mysteries, that appeal to popular tastes and are often considered inferior in style and content to more artistic literature.

subliterature

(ˈsʌbˌlɪtrətʃə)
n
(Literary & Literary Critical Terms) writings which are not considered good or artistic enough to be called literature
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References in periodicals archive ?
Inversely, some colleagues dismiss Steinbeck as subliterature since you don't need an expert to help you comprehend him.
Although many school librarians and teachers value the educational and recreational benefits of graphic novels, there are still the naysayers who view them as subliterature that undermines literacy rather than enhances it.
In thinking about what types of models offer promise for a better understanding of earnings losses for displaced workers, I think it is important to view the empirical papers on this topic as a subliterature within the broader literature on wage dynamics.
The novels fold those historical accounts back into nineteenth-century fictional forms: the picaresque, melodrama and ghost story of Victorian fiction, borrowing also from the pornographic subliterature revealed in The Other Victorians.
In his 1996 essay "Zen and the Art of Mario Maintenance: Cycles of Death and Rebirth in Video Games and Children's Subliterature," Gary Westfahl begins an examination of the compulsion to repeat the pixelated experience of simulated death with reference to what he calls "an impressive work of prediction" (211).
Fourth, the literature of rejuvenation marks the appearance of a type of subliterature that mixes mass culture and pure literature.
Within the above dialogue on merger policy in an open-economy setting exists a subliterature that specifically considers the impact of industry trade balance on optimal domestic merger policy.
(2.) There is also another subliterature that looks at the impact of specific presidential speeches on public opinion.
Bould begins his essay with the observation that although there has been an outpouring of fantastic literature and film, and of studies of the fantastic, over the past thirty years, Marxist considerations of the fantastic have tended to follow (and to be limited to) Suvin's dismissal of fantasy as a "subliterature of mystification." Bould's essay, and the Symposium more generally, are attempts to redress this imbalance.
PRISCILLA td1 = sliprail PRISCILLA ta1 = pilgarlics PRISCILLA ta2 - capillaries, pluralistic BEAULIEU ta5 = subliterature, sublieutenant WIESBADEN ta2 = bawdinesses WIESBADEN ta3 = breadwinners, windbreakers