submicroscopic


Also found in: Medical.

sub·mi·cro·scop·ic

 (sŭb′mī-krə-skŏp′ĭk)
adj.
Too small to be resolved by an optical microscope.

sub′mi·cro·scop′i·cal·ly adv.

submicroscopic

(ˌsʌbmaɪkrəˈskɒpɪk)
adj
too small to be seen through an optical microscope
ˌsubmicroˈscopically adv

sub•mi•cro•scop•ic

(ˌsʌb maɪ krəˈskɒp ɪk)

also sub`mi•cro•scop′i•cal,



adj.
too small to be seen through a microscope.
[1910–15]
sub`mi•cro•scop′i•cal•ly, adv.
Translations

submicroscopic

[ˈsʌbˌmaɪkrəsˈkɒpɪk] ADJsubmicroscópico
References in periodicals archive ?
Sudi et al., "Novel submicroscopic chromosomal abnormalities detected in autism spectrum disorder," Biological Psychiatry, vol.
Thus, there is a clearly defined relationship between the properties of concrete and the features of the structure of cement stone: increasing the number of low-basic calcium hydrosilicates as well as increasing gel content and, correspondingly, reducing capillary porosity, especially at the submicroscopic level, predetermine the increase in strength and decrease in the permeability of concrete.
By showing the alignment of molecular bonds and submicroscopic shapes, polarized light offered a way to bridge the resolution gap between light and electron microscopy, while observing living cells.
The passive emission of submicroscopic mineral phases on plants was used to evaluate the quality of the environment.
In conclusion, the combined use of array CGH and MLPA have increased the detection rate of submicroscopic chromosomal aberrations, and is an effective and specific means to diagnose WHS and allows for the precise identification of the breakpoints and sizes of deletions.
Contract award notice: diagnostic submicroscopic gene chip to perform illumina iscan analyzer.
Among the Gobstopper's ingredients were submicroscopic particles of titanium dioxide, a substance commonly added to plastics, paint, cosmetics and sunscreen.
The greenish colour of the brecciated masses was possibly due to the secondary formation of submicroscopic chlorite.
Researchers have long known that the Moon's surface darkens over time because tiny meteorites pepper the lunar dust, momentarily flash-melting iron-bearing silicate minerals and creating submicroscopic bits of metallic iron.
We would like to note that, in this article, we do not intend to analyze the theoretical basis of the "segmentation principle" or study how visual tools help enhance learning submicroscopic processes, like enzymes under action.