suboptimization


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suboptimization

(ˌsʌbɒptɪmaɪˈzeɪʃən) or

suboptimisation

n
1. a situation which is less than optimal
2. (Industrial Relations & HR Terms) the optimization of an organization's subunits
References in periodicals archive ?
Overall, CO can be applied in a variety of applications, and in fact, it can be seen that it is possible to partition an aircraft family design problem into family members [104] and also to simplify complex problems like control integration by considering each mission segment as a different suboptimization [28].
The estimation of signal [b.sub.k] by a suboptimization method is determined, which is the least squares method.
Each part i (i=1, 2,..., N) is a suboptimization problem of (8) as decentralized optimization.
In addition, its dynamic implementation using a traffic simulator is highly challenging because it requires solving suboptimization problems to calibrate the AL of the sub-most preferred routes.
This often resulted in the suboptimization or replication with regard to organizational investment in different aspects related to security.
Hence, we iteratively determine the optimal values in single variable suboptimization problems that are decoupled from the original problem in terms of l, [alpha], [beta], [lambda], and p.
In their work, the design process was separated into two parts as geometry modifications and suboptimization. The complex method is applied in the geometry modifications part, and an analogous scaling procedure for displacement which constrains with the stress ratio method is applied in the suboptimization part.
After the complete process is better understood, commonsense improvements that identify suboptimization, eliminate unnecessary or duplicate effort, and better manage process flow will become evident.
(31) He further noted that while accounting within a "suboptimization" was easy, the main thrust of cost imposition involves impacting investment choices occurring outside the area of competition.
Functional specialization among firms also eliminates the inefficiencies of interfunctional suboptimization within a firm.
The longer the distribution channel, the greater the potential for "peaks" of suboptimization, inaccurate or insufficient information along the chain, inefficiencies, and higher operating costs (Anderson, Fine & Parker, 2000).
In fact, no transfer-price scheme will really solve the suboptimization problem.