subordinancy

subordinancy

(sʌbˈɔːdɪnənsɪ)
n
another word for subordination
References in periodicals archive ?
Otherwise, they are not hierarchically inferior." (226) Although others are skeptical that Article III es tablishes such a strict requirement of subordinancy, (227) general agreement exists that the Court cannot be denied review authority in all cases from the lower federal courts presenting constitutional questions.
Like that sovereign artist or universal plastick nature, he forms a whole, coherent and proportion'd in it-self, with due subjection and subordinancy of constituent parts'.(50) According to Walzel, the image of `universal plastick nature' can be traced throughout the eighteenth century, and culminated in Schelling's assertion that the universe itself was the most perfect work of art.(51) It certainly inspired the eighteenth-century fascination with the Isle of Staffa.
The needs of normal, healthy adults, according to Argyris (1957), are to develop from passive infants into active adults, to move from dependent to independence in relationships, to increase one's range of effective behaviors, to understand complex problems and opportunities and to see them as challenges, to develop a long term time perspective, to move from a position of subordinancy to equality, and to gain autonomy over one's behavior.