subordinationism

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subordinationism

(səˌbɔːdɪˈneɪʃəˌnɪzəm)
n
(Theology) either of two interpretations of the doctrine of the Trinity, often regarded as heretical, according to which the Son is subordinate to the Father or the Holy Ghost is subordinate to both
subˌordiˈnationist n
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

subordinationism

the theological tenet of progressively declining essence within the Trinity. — subordinationist, n.
See also: Christianity
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Examination of the Eternal Subordinationist View of the Trinity.
Chapter 3 shows how this subordinationist Pneumatology, and its implicitly anhypostatic (or at least insufficiently hypostatic) conception of the Spirit, are present in Latin theologians such as Augustine, Anselm, and Thomas, and among Greek theologians such as Athanasius and even Basil of Caesarea and his brother Gregory of Nyssa.
Likewise, in his discussion of Milton's gender politics, Shawcross does not seem to grant sufficient latitude for a consideration of the entanglements of a "subordinationist" and "egalitarian" discourse in Paradise Lost.
Shepardson argues that Ephrem, geographically situated on the borders of the Christian Roman Empire, first in Nisibis and then in Rome, had a mission to promote the tenets of the Council of Nicaea, and that this included attacking the "Jewish" beliefs of subordinationist Christians by identifying them with God's rejected People.
in light of contemporary thought patterns." (18) Such a "revision" would purge the Trinity of its alleged "subordinationist elements," (19) by which is meant the entire apparatus that, prior to revision, had upheld the much-desired relationality, namely its "order," "hierarchy," "relations of origin," "processions," and the unique "hypostases," which those relations are understood to posit.
As we will see, Coleridge's uncertainties would be explicable as the understandable consequence of a rigorously Unitarian or subordinationist perspective in regards to Christology, a perspective that Coleridge is thought to have held at the time of the original composition of The Rime, which emphasized the single personality of God, rejected any Trinitarian model as licit, and dispensed with Jesus's divine humanity by esteeming him as an exemplary, albeit wholly human, prophet and teacher.
Reluctant to engage quarrels about Milton's alleged "heresies," Shawcross argues against calling Milton an "Arian" or even an "antitrinitarian," preferring instead to paint him as a "subordinationist" with solidly "Protestant" credentials.
Athanasius was not a major intellectual but his denunciation of all his subordinationist opponents as heretical Arians impressed many and he was one of the few Greek bishops to attract a following in the Latin West.
In attacking the church for denying priestly ordination to women, Wills never once mentions Pope John Paul II's rejection, in his aptly titled apostolic letter Mulieris Dignitatem, of previous subordinationist interpretations of scriptural texts which denied equal dignity to women.
On the one hand, a "subordinationist" reading regarded the Bible as a book of hierarchical authority, extending from the text to the church, and urging patient acceptance of ones lot as ordained by God within a fixed order.