subschema


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subschema

(sʌbˈskiːmə)
n
a part of a computer database which is used by an individual
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
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Neither Kempen (1969) nor Combrink (1990) could be used for the constructional subschema related to the hyphen, since neither of them consider hyphens as linking morphemes.
This implies the assumption of a specific subschema for Haupt-compounds in German, in which the meaning 'main' is specified.
Administration Maintain schema and subschema. Test DBMS proper operation.
Furthermore, if a type the subschemata [[??].sub.1] and [[??].sub.2] has components outside the subschema, these components will be preserved in the join.
Chen & Hanson, supra note 13, at 1205 ("When confronted with disconfirming information individuals can carve out a special subschema for that evidence in a way that preserves more general schema--like an 'exception that proves the rule.'").
(5) For example, the adjective childless instantiates/elaborates one of the most salient subschema of the -less subcategory, while the adjective sugar-free is an instantiation/elaboration of the most salient subschema of the -free subcategory.
(1) Users felt that being able to see the objects already created by other designers/users while designing their own part of the subschema was useful.
Evidence for subschemata at this level stems from distributional observations: as opposed to ENHG -lich-derivation, the NHG -lich-pattern operates only on nouns and adjectives, while the deverbal subschema has become inactive (see below); quite complementarily, NHG -bar-derivation ([approximate egual to]'X-able') focuses on deverbal derivation almost exclusively (cf.
Categories and Subject Descriptors: H.2.1 [Database Management]: Logical Design--schema and subschema
CR Categories and Subject Descriptors: D.2.1 [Software Engineering]: Requirements/Specifications--methodologies; H.2.1 [Database Management]: Logical Design--data models, schema and subschema; H.2.3 [Database Management]: Languages--data description languages (DDL)
It is worth pointing out that the exploitation of IPD does not introduce scalability problems; in fact, even if IPD must be computed for each pair of XML Schemas into consideration, the worst case time complexity of its derivation is smaller than that associated with the extraction of subschema similarities (see (6), Theorems 2.2, 2.4 and 2.5 and Section 3.9).
In particular, the schema of a mental space provides a thematic and stylistic framework based on a compound of multiple subschemas. A schema adaptively forms or reforms by the generalization of stories and reorganization of existing schemas.