subsentence

subsentence

(ˈsʌbˌsɛntəns)
n
(Logic) a part of a sentence which can stand by itself as a sentence
References in periodicals archive ?
So the TTS for the combined sentences dictates an overlap between this consequential state and the eventuality expressed in the subsentence. To both, the actual eventuality of deceiving is anterior.
Intuitively, the alternation level of [Psi] in [Psi] is the number of alternating fixed-point operators we have to "wrap [Psi] with" in order to reach a subsentence of [Psi].
Identifying its ambiguity with the singular/general ambiguity of a modal comment on its subsentence, as Stalnaker presumably would with (2), yields only two senses.
By uttering a subsentence, and communicating a proposition, the speaker is inviting the audience to add some LF of the appropriate semantic type but not further guiding them with linguistic material.
The ANs with TCM-WM combined treatment contain relatively simple short narrations (e.g., short subsentences) and abbreviations of technical terms.
After the translation of each of the simple sentences, the system again rejoins the entire subsentences and also adds the removed interrogative and negative words in the sentence.
In this paper, the author challenges the common wisdom (see Dummett and Davidson) that sentences are the minimal units with which one can perform a speech act or make a move in the language game, arguing, with Perry and Stainton, that subsentences can be used to perform full-fledged speech acts.
Stainton, R.J., 2006, Words and Thoughts: Subsentences, Ellipsis and the Philosophy of Language, Oxford University Press, Oxford.
[..] It is all very well to refuse to speak of 'understanding' and 'possession' of meaning in connection with the language of thought, and thereby to hope to retain the idea that when a complex is, properly speaking, 'understood', inference is invariably involved." (3) Dummett says that if language is to serve as a medium of communication, "it is not sufficient that a sentence should in fact be true under the interpretation placed on it by one speaker just in case it is true under that placed on it by another; it is also necessary that both speakers should be aware of the fact." (4) Dummett concludes that all that is essentially presupposed for the understanding of a complex sentence is the understanding of the subsentences. (5)
Robert Stainton Words and Thoughts: Subsentences, Ellipsis and the Philosophy of Language.