subservience


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sub·ser·vi·ent

 (səb-sûr′vē-ənt)
adj.
1. Subordinate in capacity or function.
2. Obsequious; servile.
3. Useful as a means or an instrument; serving to promote an end.

[Latin subserviēns, subservient-, present participle of subservīre, to subserve; see subserve.]

sub·ser′vi·ence, sub·ser′vi·en·cy n.
sub·ser′vi·ent·ly adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.subservience - the condition of being something that is useful in reaching an end or carrying out a plan; "all his actions were in subservience to the general plan"
condition, status - a state at a particular time; "a condition (or state) of disrepair"; "the current status of the arms negotiations"
2.subservience - in a subservient state
subordinateness, subsidiarity - secondary importance
3.subservience - abject or cringing submissiveness
submissiveness - the trait of being willing to yield to the will of another person or a superior force etc.
sycophancy - fawning obsequiousness
Translations

subservience

[səbˈsɜːvɪəns] N
1. [of person] (= submissiveness) → sumisión f; (= servility) → servilismo m
a life of subservience and drudgeryuna vida de sumisión y monotonía
subservience to sbsumisión a algn
2. (= secondary position) → subordinación f (to a)

subservience

[səbˈsɜːrviəns] nsoumission f
subservience to sb → soumission à qn

subservience

n (pej)Unterwürfigkeit f(to gegenüber); (form)Unterworfenheit f (→ to unter +acc)

subservience

[səbˈsɜːvɪns] n subservience (to)sottomissione f (a)
References in classic literature ?
Here, as elsewhere, he was surrounded by an atmosphere of subservience to his wealth, and being in the habit of lording it over these people, he treated them with absent-minded contempt.
It was the soft, amiable Negro voice, like those I remembered from early childhood, with the note of docile subservience in it.
His attitude became one of good-humored subservience and tacit adoration.
There are deferential people in a dozen callings whom my Lady Dedlock suspects of nothing but prostration before her, who can tell you how to manage her as if she were a baby, who do nothing but nurse her all their lives, who, humbly affecting to follow with profound subservience, lead her and her whole troop after them; who, in hooking one, hook all and bear them off as Lemuel Gulliver bore away the stately fleet of the majestic Lilliput.
For the Lilliputians think nothing can be more unjust, than for people, in subservience to their own appetites, to bring children into the world, and leave the burthen of supporting them on the public.
They patronized the university and the churches, and the pastors especially bowed at their knees in meek subservience.
She could not indeed imitate his excess of subservience, because she was a stranger to the meanness of mind, and to the constant state of timid apprehension, by which it was dictated; but she bore herself with a proud humility, as if submitting to the evil circumstances in which she was placed as the daughter of a despised race, while she felt in her mind the consciousness that she was entitled to hold a higher rank from her merit, than the arbitrary despotism of religious prejudice permitted her to aspire to.
Lydgate was no Puritan, but he did not care for play, and winning money at it had always seemed a meanness to him; besides, he had an ideal of life which made this subservience of conduct to the gaining of small sums thoroughly hateful to him.
This was the easier, in that she was perfect mistress of that diplomatic art which unites the utmost subservience of manner with the utmost inflexibility as to measure.
Here it was before him, a courtroom and a judge, bowed down in subservience by the machine to a dive-keeper who swung a string of votes.
The rantings of Mr Charles Clarke and his Home Office zealots have about them that which might be the near-hysteria of those who recognise their own incompetence, but believe that they can bully and threaten others into subservience.
In 31 chapters they show how that power provided, paradoxically, slavery and freedom, wealth and poverty, privilege and subservience, war and peace, and how the systems and frameworks of power that functioned domestically became the model for how America chose to deal with the rest of the world.