subservient

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sub·ser·vi·ent

 (səb-sûr′vē-ənt)
adj.
1. Subordinate in capacity or function.
2. Obsequious; servile.
3. Useful as a means or an instrument; serving to promote an end.

[Latin subserviēns, subservient-, present participle of subservīre, to subserve; see subserve.]

sub·ser′vi·ence, sub·ser′vi·en·cy n.
sub·ser′vi·ent·ly adv.

subservient

(səbˈsɜːvɪənt)
adj
1. obsequious in behaviour or attitude
2. serving as a means to an end
3. a less common word for subordinate2
[C17: from Latin subserviēns complying with, from subservīre to subserve]
subˈserviently adv
subˈservience, subˈserviency n

sub•ser•vi•ent

(səbˈsɜr vi ənt)

adj.
1. serving or acting in a subordinate capacity; subordinate.
2. servile; excessively submissive; obsequious.
3. useful in promoting a purpose or end.
[1625–35; < Latin subservient-, s. of subserviēns, present participle of subservīre to subserve; see -ent]
sub•ser′vi•ence, sub•ser′vi•en•cy, n.
sub•ser′vi•ent•ly, adv.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Adj.1.subservient - compliant and obedient to authority; "editors and journalists who express opinions in print that are opposed to the interests of the rich are dismissed and replaced by subservient ones"-G. B. Shaw
subordinate - subject or submissive to authority or the control of another; "a subordinate kingdom"
2.subservient - serving or acting as a means or aid; "instrumental in solving the crime"
helpful - providing assistance or serving a useful function
3.subservient - abjectly submissive; characteristic of a slave or servant; "slavish devotion to her job ruled her life"; "a slavish yes-man to the party bosses"- S.H.Adams; "she has become submissive and subservient"
servile - submissive or fawning in attitude or behavior; "spoke in a servile tone"; "the incurably servile housekeeper"; "servile tasks such as floor scrubbing and barn work"

subservient

adjective
1. servile, submissive, deferential, subject, inferior, abject, sycophantic, slavish, obsequious, truckling, bootlicking (informal) Her willingness to be subservient to her children isolated her.
servile bossy, domineering, overbearing, superior, overriding, rebellious, wilful, disobedient, bolshie
2. subordinate, subsidiary, accessory, auxiliary, conducive, ancillary The individual's needs are seen as subservient to the group's.

subservient

adjective
1. In a position of subordination:
2. Excessively eager to serve or obey:
Translations

subservient

[səbˈsɜːvɪənt] ADJ
1. [person] (= submissive) → sumiso (pej) (= servile) → servil
to be subservient to sbsometerse a algn
2. (= secondary) → subordinado (to a)

subservient

[səbˈsɜːrviənt] adj
(= servile) → soumis(e)
(= less important) subservient to sth → soumis(e) à qch

subservient

adj (pej)unterwürfig (to gegenüber); (form)unterworfen (→ to +dat)

subservient

[səbˈsɜːvɪənt] adj subservient (to)sottomesso/a (a)
References in classic literature ?
It is no wonder that in an age when this kind of merit is so little in fashion, and so slenderly provided for, persons possessed of it should very eagerly flock to a place where they were sure of being received with great complaisance; indeed, where they might enjoy almost the same advantages of a liberal fortune as if they were entitled to it in their own right; for Mr Allworthy was not one of those generous persons who are ready most bountifully to bestow meat, drink, and lodging on men of wit and learning, for which they expect no other return but entertainment, instruction, flattery, and subserviency; in a word, that such persons should be enrolled in the number of domestics, without wearing their master's cloathes, or receiving wages.
I look upon the subserviency of woman as largely due to her abandoning nutritious drinks and invigorating exercises to the male.
Many of the men sprang forward, officiously, to offer their services, either from the hope of the reward, or from that cringing subserviency which is one of the most baleful effects of slavery.
O'Connell was furious and broke links with them, decrying their "subserviency" and denouncing them as "the most time-serving crouching creatures that ever lived."
Ultimately, it was this perceived need and capacity for self-denial in women, be it real or imagined, that fed the idea of woman as the "Angel in the House." Since the middle-class woman was "the least engaged member of the household," educators like Sarah Ellis repeatedly insisted that a virtuous woman "should devote herself to the good of others" and "bring down [her] every selfish desire, and every rebellious thought, to a due subserviency"--actions that require a daily, lifelong pattern of self- denial (Gilbert and Gubar 816; see also McGhee 5).
And finally, "the last & not the least objection is the liability of the practice to a subserviency to political views," (151) meaning that what is ostensibly a governmental proclamation to encourage religious devotion turns out in practice to be some governmental official's attempt to use religion as a political tool or a weapon against political opponents.
5; 'Native Outrages in the Northern Island', Auckland Times, 11 February 1845; 'Official Subserviency', Nelson Examiner, 29 September 1849; 'Correspondence', Daily Southern Cross, 15 August 1851, p.
Our citizens have the right to protection from the incompetency of public employees who hold their places solely as the reward of partisan service, and from the corrupting influence of those who promise and the vicious methods of those who expect such rewards; and those who worthily seek public employment have the right to insist that merit and competency shall be recognized instead of party subserviency or the surrender of honest political belief.
In a famous essay on the relationship of theory to practice, Dewey (1904/1964) expressed his concern about the lack of "intellectual independence among teachers, their tendency toward intellectual subserviency" (p.
Long before Giroux (1990), Dewey sought to help teachers--even novice teachers--understand and assume their vital role as public intellectuals; and he (1916/1944) frequently decried "the lack of intellectual independence among teachers, their tendency to intellectual subserviency" (p.
The Full Faith and Credit Clause does not require subserviency from the state where the crime occurred.