substantialism

(redirected from substantialist)
Related to substantialist: Substantialism

substantialism

(səbˈstænʃəˌlɪzəm)
n
1. (Philosophy) the doctrine that a substantial reality underlies phenomena
2. (Philosophy) the doctrine that matter is a real substance
subˈstantialist n
References in periodicals archive ?
Brubaker proposes a "cognitive turn in the study of groups in order to avoid "analytical groupism" (a tendency to conceptualize racial, ethnic, and national groups in substantialist terms): "Race, ethnicity, and nationality exist and are reproduced from day to day in and through such perceptions, interpretations, representations, classifications, categorizations, and identifications" (Brubaker 2009, 39).
For if the reference to the pudgala can certainly be interpreted in nearly substantialist terms (as the Pudgalavadins and several modern interpreters did), the ambiguous way in which this reference is introduced (iti sydd vacaniyam (21)) as well as the recourse to the parvanivasnusmrti formula can no less certainly be taken as a warning against such an interpretation and as emphasizing the very conventionality of the pudgala alluded to (as the "mainstream" Buddhist scholars did).
Nevertheless, it is important to stress that the Suarezian model posits an explanation that may be considered to be a first step in the transition from a substantialist conception of nature to an eventualist one.
Nietzsche also credits Boscovich's understanding of atoms as centers of force with helping to dethrone substantialist ontologies.
The first, called substantialist, is associated with Friedman (and Freyssenet but also with the neoclassical economists.
Moreover, Leibniz seemed to find in the trinitarian conception of god, conceptual resources for an alternative conception of the mind to that of Spinoza--an approach that was, like his approach to space and time--fundamentally relational rather than substantialist.
123) reminded us, 'Breaking with misleading appearances and with the errors inscribed in substantialist thought about place' can only be achieved 'through a rigorous analysis of the relations between the structures of social space and those of physical space'.
The ecclesiological convergence I have tried to outline is essentially substantialist in emphasizing reception of the church's apostolic heritage, but it tempers such an understanding by insisting that the church does not exist for its own sake, that the eschatological dimension must not be obscured, and that no empirical church should identify itself alone with the Church of Christ.
substantialist conceptions toward an understanding of sacrament as
Buddhism needed to overcome its unreal disengagement from worldly particularity, he argued, and Christianity needed to be delivered from the bondage of a substantialist self.
That is to say, whether von Balthasar espouses a substantialist account of gender, and, if so, the questions this might raise cannot be treated here.
Its fundamental tenet is that something is more elemental than life, namely Being understood informationally, and hence, something more fundamental than pleasure and pain, namely "entropy" {this is not the physicists' concept of entropy; entropy here means destruction of informational objects, that is, nothingness, in the vocabulary of the old substantialist metaphysics of Being).