substernal


Also found in: Medical.

substernal

(sʌbˈstɜːnəl)
adj
(Anatomy) anatomy below the sternum or breastbone
Translations

sub·ster·nal

a. subesternal, debajo del esternón.
References in periodicals archive ?
Typical angina was defined as "the presence of substernal chest pain or discomfort that was provoked by exertion or emotional stress and was relieved by rest and/or nitroglycerin3."
Increased level of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), iodine deficiency in the diet and clinical reflection of many pathologies may cause this.1 Though 85-90% of the goiters are in the cervical region and 10-15% in the intrathoracic region, although they differ between the studies.3 The concept of substernal goiter was first used by Haller and since then this concept has been controversial and it still does not have a single definition today.4,5 Retrosternal, substernal, intrathoracic, or mediastinal goiter concepts are the concepts that are used for goiters that extend downwards from the thoracic entry, and that do not currently have an agreement about them.1
Substernal chest discomfort with a characteristic quality and duration that is provoked by exertion or emotional stress, and
The issue of a substernal bar for sternal support was described by Adkins and Blades in 1961.
As the dissection of the substernal area was performed through adipose tissue, no bleeding or soft tissue injury occurred.
A contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) scan of her neck obtained from an outside facility demonstrated a diffusely enlarged thyroid gland with substernal extension and bilateral lateral neck reactive-appearing lymphadenopathy.
The advantage of this approach is that it is easy to perform because the RLN entry point is relatively constant; it is especially useful for large cervical or substernal goiters, where the nerve cannot be found using a lateral or inferior approach.
He reported that 1 week prior while eating a homemade barbeque dinner, he experienced dysphagia to solid food and mild substernal pain.
The incidence of the substernal or mediastinal extension of a goiter ranges between 2.6% and 30.4% (1-6).
Holcomb, "A straightforward technique for removal of the substernal bar after the Nuss operation," Journal of Pediatric Surgery, vol.
The most common indications for surgery are compressive symptoms (dysphagia or shortness of breath), substernal extension, hyperthyroidism resistant to medical therapy, and suspicion of malignancy [1,2].
Patients with substernal goiter, age < 18, emergency reoperation, and preexisting neck pain and patients with respiratory disease were excluded from the study.