substitutability


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sub·sti·tute

 (sŭb′stĭ-to͞ot′, -tyo͞ot′)
n.
1. One that takes the place of another: finding substitutes for coal; came in as a substitute at the end of the game.
2. Grammar A word or construction used in place of another word, phrase, or clause.
v. sub·sti·tut·ed, sub·sti·tut·ing, sub·sti·tutes
v.tr.
1. To put or use (a person or thing) in place of another: substituted plastic for steel to reduce the weight.
2. Usage Problem To replace: substituted the worn-out couch with a new one; original artworks that were substituted by fakes.
v.intr.
To take the place of another: "Only art can substitute for nature" (Leonard Bernstein).

[Middle English, from Old French substitut, from Latin substitūtus, past participle of substituere, to substitute : sub-, in place of; see sub- + statuere, to cause to stand; see stā- in Indo-European roots.]

sub′sti·tut′a·bil′it·y n.
sub′sti·tut′a·ble adj.
sub′sti·tu′tive (-to͞o′tĭv, -tyo͞o′-) adj.
Usage Note: When you describe an action in which you remove one item and put a different item in its place, it's important to clearly identify which item is taking the place of the other. The verbs usually used for this kind of action are replace and substitute, which have converse meanings: if you take away an old thing and put a new thing in its place, you are replacing the old thing with the new thing, or substituting the new thing for the old thing. In the passive voice, old is replaced with new, or new is substituted for old. Sometimes, however, people switch the placement of old and new when using the verb substitute, especially in the passive voice. For example, in a low-calorie recipe that uses applesauce (the new thing) instead of butter (the old thing), the two standard constructions are Butter is replaced with applesauce or Applesauce is substituted for butter. But people sometimes say Butter is substituted by [or with] applesauce. This use of substitute is widely criticized, and most of the Usage Panel dislikes it: in our 2013 survey, 80 percent disapproved of this sentence with the preposition by, and 67 percent disapproved of it with with. In sports, however, one often encounters the less standard use of substitute, where the old player is substituted for the new one rather than vice versa. The Usage Panel is more accepting of such usage in this context; in 2013, just over half the Panel (56 percent) disapproved of the sentence The goalie allowed three goals in the first 12 minutes and was substituted before the end of the period. Unless you are discussing sports, adhering to the traditional constructions will make your writing clearer: replace the old with the new; substitute the new for the old.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.substitutability - exchangeability by virtue of being replaceable
exchangeability, fungibility, interchangeability, interchangeableness - the quality of being capable of exchange or interchange
References in periodicals archive ?
In the second step, D-SIBs are designated from among the sample banks on the basis of institutions' systemic score in terms of their size, interconnectedness, substitutability, and complexity.
* Giulia Bovini, London School of Economics, and Matteo Paradisi, Harvard University, "Labor Substitutability and the Impact of Raising the Retirement Age"
The Chamber states that the two aligned proposals are a "substantial improvement" over current liquidity, capital, and prudential regulations but thinks midsize and regional banks, upon whom Main Street businesses depend, would be better off if, instead of asset size, financial institutions are grouped based on a multifactor assessment that considers size, interconnectedness, substitutability, complexity, and cross-jurisdictional activity.
Since 2013, the telecom market of Oman has witnessed many developments including, but not limited to, introduction of new players, introduction of new services, change in substitutability of services and level of competition.
In terms of substitutability across sources, China was able to source chicken from its large domestic production base and other international markets; the same is true for sorghum if we consider its close substitutes.
The researchers find, however, that the reduced pool of foreign workers did not lead firms to hire more Americans, and conclude that this suggests "low substitutability between native-born and H-1B workers in the same skill groups." The cap only applies to for-profit companies, not to new employees of educational institutions or nonprofit research institutions.
Essentially, once Apple has sold the phone to those willing to pay the most for it, it can then capture the rest of us by reducing the price over time.If you baulk at a $1,800 price tag for a smartphone, that's because you are making decisions on the basis of a concept called "substitutability".
The second critique is that his model assumes that there is perfect substitutability between natives and immigrants within each skill cell.
Banks were assessed on four specific factors such as size, interconnectedness, substitutability and complexity.
The framework is based on five broad measures of bank structure that reflect channels through which a bank's failure could impact the world financial system: size, interconnectedness, substitutability, cross-jurisdictional activity, and complexity.