substratum

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sub·stra·tum

(sŭb′strā′təm, -străt′əm)
n. pl. sub·stra·ta (-strā′tə, -străt′ə) or sub·stra·tums
1.
a. An underlying layer.
b. A layer of earth beneath the surface soil; subsoil.
2. A foundation or groundwork.
3. The material on which another material is coated or fabricated.
4. Philosophy The underlying characterless substance that supports attributes of material reality.
5. Biology A substrate.
6. Linguistics A substrate.

[New Latin substrātum, from neuter of Latin substrātus, past participle of substernere, to lay under : sub-, sub- + sternere, to stretch, spread; see ster-2 in the Appendix of Indo-European roots.]

sub·stra′tive adj.

substratum

(sʌbˈstrɑːtəm; -ˈstreɪ-)
n, pl -strata (-ˈstrɑːtə; -ˈstreɪtə)
1. any layer or stratum lying underneath another
2. a basis or foundation; groundwork
3. (Biology) the nonliving material on which an animal or plant grows or lives
4. (Geological Science) geology
a. the solid rock underlying soils, gravels, etc; bedrock
b. the surface to which a fixed organism is attached
5. (Sociology) sociol any of several subdivisions or grades within a stratum
6. (Photography) photog a binding layer by which an emulsion is made to adhere to a glass or film base. Sometimes shortened to: sub
7. (Philosophy) philosophy substance considered as that in which attributes and accidents inhere
8. (Linguistics) linguistics the language of an indigenous population when replaced by the language of a conquering or colonizing population, esp as it influences the form of the dominant language or of any mixed languages arising from their contact. Compare superstratum2
[C17: from New Latin, from Latin substrātus strewn beneath, from substernere to spread under, from sub- + sternere to spread]
subˈstrative, subˈstratal adj

sub•stra•tum

(ˈsʌbˌstreɪ təm, -ˌstræt əm, sʌbˈstreɪ təm, -ˈstræt əm)

n., pl. -stra•ta (-ˌstreɪ tə, -ˌstræt ə, -ˈstreɪ tə, -ˈstræt ə) -stra•tums.
1. something that is spread or laid under something else; a stratum or layer lying under another.
2. something that underlies or serves as a basis or foundation.
3. the subsoil.
[1625–35; < New Latin; see sub-, stratum]
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.substratum - a surface on which an organism grows or is attached; "the gardener talked about the proper substrate for acid-loving plants"
surface - the extended two-dimensional outer boundary of a three-dimensional object; "they skimmed over the surface of the water"; "a brush small enough to clean every dental surface"; "the sun has no distinct surface"
2.substratum - any stratum or layer lying underneath another
stratum - one of several parallel layers of material arranged one on top of another (such as a layer of tissue or cells in an organism or a layer of sedimentary rock)
3.substratum - an indigenous language that contributes features to the language of an invading people who impose their language on the indigenous population; "the Celtic languages of Britain are a substrate for English"
indigenous language - a language that originated in a specified place and was not brought to that place from elsewhere

substratum

noun
The lowest or supporting part or structure:
Translations

substratum

[ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtəm] N (substrata (pl)) [ˈsʌbˈstrɑːtə]sustrato m

substratum

n pl <substrata> → Substrat nt; (Geol) → Untergrund m; (Sociol) → Substratum nt

substratum

[sʌbˈstrɑːtəm] n (substrata (pl)) [sʌbˈstrɑːtə] (Geol) (fig) → sostrato

sub·stra·tum

n. sustrato, fundación, base en la que vive un organismo.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team posits that Africanisms were the result of adstratal, rather than substratal influence because the initial formation of creoles took place rapidly and was followed by a prolonged process of bilingualism.
Among the topics are medieval wills and the rise of written monolingual English, radical word order change by substratal causation: English versus German, late medieval dialectal and obsolescent spellings in the 16th-century editions of the Kalender of Shepherdes, and the status of may in Middle English medical writing: evidence from Middle English Medical Texts and the M[sz]laga Corpus of Late Middle English Scientific Prose.
2), Jeffersonian republicanism is about putting into place a substratal political structure that allows for preservation of rights and for periodic constitutional revisions in keeping with advances in science and public enlightenment, thereby allowing for fullest actualization of human capacities for citizens on all levels.
The reception to his argument by Yiddish, Germanic, and Slavic linguists, on the contrary, was, or at least seemed, quite dispassionate, framed in the jargon of the trade (discussions of dialectology, isoglosses, substratal and adstratal components, diphthongization, and such).
The etymological analysis of Burushaski shepherd vocabulary shows that almost all the pastoral terms in this language are of Indo-European origin (some thirty independently of Indie and Iranian), with a significant proportion showing close correlations with the Paleobalkanic substratal shepherd terms.
Wiik, we have a vast area of language shift that has left behind significant substratal influences in Germanic, Slavic and Baltic languages.
Aside from substratal effects, Dravidian systems seem to be a starting point, not an intermediate stage in kinship evolution.