subterrane

(redirected from subterrain)

subterrane

(ˈsʌbtəˌreɪn) or

subterrene

n
(Physical Geography) an underground cave; a chamber or region beneath the ground. Also called: subterrain
adj
a variant of subterranean
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
"Subterrain is just going to be something that we have to contend" with, said Army Lt.
Although now transformed into a beautiful green space, the landfill beneath the surface tells a different story and this environmental issue has become the subterrain on which our event is quite literally based.
"At the same time they will be getting away through the subway or subterrain. How do we train to fight that?
For Weizman, the vertical is opened by "severing the territory into different, discontinuous layers'" (2002, emphasis added): the subterrain, the surface, the air.
As well as Rooster, Rambert is premiering Frames, a new work from choreographer Alexander Whitley, which lays bare the process of making a dance performance, and Subterrain, a striking, sensual work, involving five couples and featuring the music of Mark-Anthony Turnage and Aphex Twin.
The bill also features Barak Marshall's The Castaways, a darkly comic dance theatre creation, and Ashley Page's atmospheric and sensual work, Subterrain.
Rooster was preceded by the beautiful but stern and discordant work Subterrain. Choreographed by Ashley Page to both classical and discordant electronic music, I found it intense and claustrophobic.
From the opening of the darkly atmospheric Subterrain, the bar was set high, with six pairs of men and women sparring with each other for control across a shadowy stage.
Ashley Page, whose work was last seen by Aberdeen audiences in 2012 with his version of The Sleeping Beauty, has created Subterrain for Rambert.
Also a creative writer, recent work is featured in subTerrain and a first novel is awaiting publication.
She contends that women expatriates shared "a whole subterrain of resistance" to restrictions then prevalent in the US, from its prohibition of alcohol to its Protestant work ethic, not to mention its hostility to sexual experimentation (13).