subtext

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Related to subtexts: subtextual, context

subtext

underlying or implicit meaning, as of a literary work: What is the subtext of the story?
Not to be confused with:
subset – a set that is part of a larger set
subtype – a subordinate type; a special type included in a more general type
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

sub·text

 (sŭb′tĕkst′)
n.
1. An implicit meaning or theme of a literary text.
2. The underlying personality of a dramatic character as implied or indicated by a script or text and interpreted by an actor in performance.

sub·tex·tu·al (-tĕks′cho͞o-əl) adj.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

subtext

(ˈsʌbˌtɛkst)
n
1. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) an underlying theme in a piece of writing
2. (Literary & Literary Critical Terms) a message which is not stated directly but can be inferred
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sub•text

(ˈsʌbˌtɛkst)

n.
the underlying or implicit meaning, as of a literary work.
[1945–50; translation of Russian podtékst]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

subtext

[ˈsʌbtekst] Nsubtexto m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

subtext

[ˈsʌbtɛkst] nsujet m sous-jacent
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

subtext

n the subtextdas eigentlich Gemeinte
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
It will take weeks for the elite pundit class to unravel all the possible implications and subtexts embedded in Robert Mueller's final report on the charge that Donald Trump and his team colluded with Russia to fix the 2016 election.
Oikawa (equity studies, York U.) examines the forgotten subjects and the subject forgotten about the internment, why the act of silencing continues, memories and subtexts, gendering the subject of the internment, economics, subtexts lost and remembered, handing down memory, and continuing to remember everything that is white as sacred.
As distinct from source studies, or studies of "influence," the subject of Meyer's book is "the dialogue between the earlier (French) and later authors, the Russian writer's interpretation of his subtexts" (11).
He has a fine seismometer for social subtexts. At a gathering of Young Democrats at the University of Washington, he is standing around when a school board candidate pounces.
"Fluttersuckers," the press release explains, "refers to the characteristics of moths that flutter and ticks that suck." This morsel of information points to the provocative subtexts and symbiotic relationships in images created with impressive sleight of hand.
Thus the painstakingly mapped, iterative trajectory of Moten's argument sometimes prevents a thorough investigation of the most powerful subtexts and corollaries to his theory.
He claimed to be a writer, who just happened to be Catholic, a teller of stories without theological subtexts, and nothing put him into an argumentative mood more quickly than to have a correspondent accuse him of allegory.
No messages and no subtexts here; Resurrection is as sweet on the palate as a malted-milk ball--and melts away just as quickly.
It is within his genre category that he also notes the subtexts that underlie either the work in general or scenes or speeches in particular.
Subtexts include the role of religion; the fallacies of science and medicine; and gender and caste equity, (KLIATT's review of the abridged version of this title appeared in Nov.
And your respect increases for Grant, a veteran actor who knows what a rare pleasure it is to encounter characters with subtexts and individual lives where you usually find cheap references to consumer-culture cliches.
Considering the dramatic influx of homosexual themes in modern television, it should come as no surprise that there might appear gay subtexts in a few TV shows -- even shows designed for children."