subtype


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subtype

a subordinate type; a special type included in a more general type
Not to be confused with:
subset – a set that is part of a larger set
subtext – underlying or implicit meaning, as of a literary work: What is the subtext of the story?
Abused, Confused, & Misused Words by Mary Embree Copyright © 2007, 2013 by Mary Embree

sub·type

 (sŭb′tīp′)
n.
A group forming a type within a larger type.
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

subtype

(ˈsʌbˌtaɪp)
n
a secondary or subordinate type or genre, esp a specific one considered as falling under a general classification
subtypical adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sub•type

(ˈsʌbˌtaɪp)

n.
1. a subordinate type.
2. a special type included within a more general type.
[1860–65]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
Translations

subtype

[ˈsʌbtaɪp] N (Bio) → subtipo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

subtype

nUnterart f
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in periodicals archive ?
The HPV-negative subtyper being applied under this NCI grant is a modified version of GeneCentric's previously-developed Head and Neck Cancer Subtype Profiler (HNSP).
According to the company, Chidamide, a benzamide-based, selective inhibitor of class I (subtypes 1, 2, 3) and IIb (subtype 10) HDACs, reverses epigenetic abnormalities related to tumorigenesis.
Molecular subtypes were grouped as follows: luminal A subtype ([ER.sup.+] or [PR.sup.+], [HER2.sup.-] and Ki-67 index [percentage of [Ki-67.sup.+] tumor cells] < 15%); luminal B subtype ([ER.sup.+] or [PR.sup.+] and [HER2.sup.+], or Ki-67 index > 15%); HER2 subtype ([ER.sup.-] and [PR.sup.-], [HER2.sup.+]), basal-like subtype ([ER.sup.-], [PR.sup.-], and [HER2.sup.-]).
In a study published in the journal JCI Insight, researchers at the University of North Carolina reported that they have pinpointed a single molecule - microRNA-31 (miR-31) - the levels of which predict whether a patient has subtype 1 or subtype 2 of the disease.
Context: Breast cancer subtype (BCS) and lymphovascular invasion (LVI) have both been independently demonstrated as prognostic factors.
Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) is critical in the progression of atherosclerosis.[3],[4] It has been regarded as a preventive target in consensus guidelines (<1.8 mmol/L is the target).[5] The Global Assessment of Plaque Regression with a PCSK9 Antibody as Measured by Intravascular Ultrasound study showed that a lower level of LDL-C was correlated with greater regression of coronary plaque.[6] Comparison of the risk factors between the LAA and SVD subtypes showed that LDL-C was more strongly related to the LAA subtype.[7] Spence and Solo [8] have recently reported that some atherosclerosis plaques could be regressed by lowering LDL-C, but others could not be regressed by this method alone.
Although routine GIM sub-typing is not recommended, recent studies suggest that an incomplete GIM subtype is also an important high-risk marker [7-9].
Prevalence of the risk factors varied among different etiologic subtypes. In LAA subtype, the most common risk factor was hypertension in 85,3% (n=118) of patients but it was not statistically significant (p=0,66), while diabetes mellitus as the second major risk factor in 77 (55%) patients was statistically significant (p=0,016).
Three main genetic lineages were described among the Eurasian H9N2 subtype viruses: G1, Y280, and Y439 (Korean) lineage (1).
According to current nomenclature, subtype 1 is erythematotelangiectatic rosacea characterized by facial redness; subtype 2 is papulopustular (PPR), marked by bumps and pimples; subtype 3 is phymatous, characterized by enlargement of the nose; and subtype 4 is ocular, marked by eye irritation.
A total of 5.9% achieved PCR in luminal A, 4.8% had PCR in luminal B (HER 2 -ve type), 23.5% had in luminal B (HER 2 +ve type), 50% achieved PCR in HER-2 over expressed type and 46.7% had PCR in triple negative subtype, (p=0.001).