suburbanism


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suburbanism

(səˈbɜːbənɪzəm)
n
1. (Anthropology & Ethnology) any trait of suburbia
2. (Anthropology & Ethnology) suburban traits collectively
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

suburbanism

the doctrines and conduct of those who regard life in suburbia superior to life in cities or country.
See also: Attitudes
the views of those who prefer to live in suburbs. — suburbanist, n., adj.
See also: Cities
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Yet since the definition of this new form of living-space remains rather obscure on the margins and the boundaries distinguishing it from preceding living-spaces and at times also from contemporary forms are not always sharply defined, it is reasonable to talk not only of a distinct form that is embodied physically to some extent in the space, but also of suburbanism as a quality shared with other forms.
[25.] Nicolae, I., Suburbanismul, ca fenomen geografic in Romania (Suburbanism, A Geographical Phenomenon in Romania), Bucharest: Meronia Publishing House, 2002.
Gans H (2005) Urbanism and suburbanism as ways of life: A reevaluation of definitions.
(212) This phenomenon, in which landowners acquire adjacent vacant lots for use as a side yard for gardens, play areas, or open space, is known as blotting and the "New Suburbanism," because it lowers density to suburban or even rural levels.
If Bloom represents not only openness and idealism but also a dynamic combination of Evans Smith's bourgeois suburbanism and Rabate's anarchic radicalism, then it may be that he comes to resemble the very antithesis of the cliche of Utopianism.
But the current practice of mandatory suburbanism across the vast majority of every metropolitan area is absurd.
The history of the British colonies, the effects on society of urbanism and suburbanism, issues of identity, and attitudes towards the colonies, immigrants, and the suburbs are interwoven themes through Kuchta's analysis, leading the reader to a fresh understanding of British notions of place as symbols of power and values through their complex associations with imperialism and colonialism.
(25) Perhaps more striking yet is the note of suburbanism that enters the anthology near its midpoint.
Bill Moshofsky - vice president of Oregonians in Action, the advocates for creeping suburbanism - is wrong three times in his Sept.
"The demand for 'walkable urbanity' is surpassing demand for 'drivable suburbanism,'" Chris Leinberger, a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution, told urban planners at the fall national meeting of the Urban Land Institute held in Denver in October.
With this, Kotkin sees a 'New Suburbanism', relying increasingly on the development of 'villages' requiring "social institutions, well-planned streets, open spaces, work spaces and housing"1 He quotes Ebenezer Howard approvingly, arguing that the development of new towns in Britain after the Second World War did not follow his vision of a suburban system.