subworld

subworld

(ˈsʌbˌwɜːld)
n
in literary theory, a world 'created' by a character within a text world or fiction, for example through a flashback or reminiscence on the part of the character; the subworld is subordinate to but not part of the text world
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
Often, they plunge in the subworld of crime and become hostages of drug dealers (who "slave" them as sellers and users of crack cocaine), corrupted police (that share benefits of criminal activities with traffickers), or even illegal militias (that, with the pretense of protecting the population, take over the business of drug dealers and terrorize entire neighborhoods by imposing taxes and their own "justice" code).
This 'subworld' is continuously changing by the addition, but also exclusion, of new elements, following processes that Latour described with relevance.
Werth (1997) and Gavins (2007) state that metaphor forms a type of epistemic subworld in the text world.
Workplace bonds constitute "an expressive subworld that runs parallel to the instrumentalities of the job for which one is paid, often using and playing off of those instrumentalities to elaborate itself, but not restricted to job concerns for its further development." (58) As such, work relationships may be much more defined by workplace dynamics than the dynamics of the home.
These symbolic narratives are similar to what Umberto Eco in The Role of the Reader labels the [W.sub.Nc]--a subworld within the world of the narrative (the [W.sub.N]) imagined, believed, or wished for by a character (235).
Moreover, this information often does not form a full-fledged frame or a "subworld" with its own system of "subframes," which would enable recuperation of inconsistencies.
Basically SP, built on the complexity research orientation, consists of an exploration and learning cycle that in an ongoing, self-organizing process (by drawing, among other things, on a tool box of hard and soft OR techniques) establishes a so-called 'subworld' around the planning problem.
The proprietor of a baseball subworld is a scruffy God living on sandwiches, pizza, and beer.
As he convincingly puts it, "formal gender inequality in the West could not be sustained on a large scale in the late 20th century except by an institutional subworld organized around religious authority."
Beyond monitoring for relevant changes that might occur anywhere, we all have patterns of avocational, recreational, ideological, and cultural interests which may lead us to follow events in one or another subworld more or less intently.
Furthermore, various types of "subworld" can exist within the text world, including those initiated by the characters.
Moreover, Eco's second and third possible worlds of the fabula, the subwodds imagined by the characters and by the Model Reader or audience are operating even by the end of Scene One: the detectives and the audience are imagining subworlds of possible gang or mad scientist activity, the audience may even be imaging other possible subworlds like alien intruders (a subworld that is indeed proposed in Scene Ten), and these subwodds should begin to give way to narrative fact once the fabula moves farther along its trajectory.