successiveness


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suc·ces·sive

 (sək-sĕs′ĭv)
adj.
1. Following in uninterrupted order; consecutive: on three successive days.
2. Of, characterized by, or involving succession: the government successive to the fallen monarchy.

suc·ces′sive·ly adv.
suc·ces′sive·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.successiveness - a following of one thing after another in time; "the doctor saw a sequence of patients"
temporal arrangement, temporal order - arrangement of events in time
pelting, rain - anything happening rapidly or in quick successive; "a rain of bullets"; "a pelting of insults"
rotation - a planned recurrent sequence (of crops or personnel etc.); "crop rotation makes a balanced demand on the fertility of the soil"; "the manager had only four starting pitchers in his rotation"
row - a continuous chronological succession without an interruption; "they won the championship three years in a row"
run - an unbroken chronological sequence; "the play had a long run on Broadway"; "the team enjoyed a brief run of victories"
References in periodicals archive ?
Yahiya's experiences in revolutionary Egypt, suffering from violence and chaos, not only 'dash the successiveness of his cheap drama,' (119) but also turn him into 'a different kind of man.' (120) According to Julia Kristeva, 'on the edge of non-existence and hallucination of a reality that, if I acknowledge it, annihilates me.
successiveness Of <i>chronos</i> is an undifferentiated time
Modernist vision, with its "all-atoneness," is founded on the cancellation of the empirical conditions of perception, including the experience of successiveness (46).
That truth emerges through, and not despite, the phrase's repetition: the recognition of finitude transfigures the experience of successiveness.
Successiveness and timeliness continue to present formidable procedural obstacles that petitioners and practitioners should not expect to circumvent.
Kermode stresses that fictions are important to us because they humanize and stabilize our existence in time, purge it of what he calls "simple chronicity" or mere "uninteresting successiveness" (46).
so terribly and so untidily expanded its endless successiveness.
Because of this successiveness, determining the division between detecting and approaching prey was difficult.
In Benjamin Fundoianu, "the interferences represent a problem of simultaneity rather than one of successiveness"; there is an "unconscious vitality," suggesting deep intensity and tumult, inhabiting poems, springing in saccates and being contrapuntal in relation with the external calm appearance of the landscape (Martin 1978: XXX).
The long unfurling course of human history constitutes an obliterating successiveness. Mighty civilizations have risen and collapsed beyond all recovery, indeed all remembrance.

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