suchness


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suchness

(ˈsʌtʃnəs)
n
1. the quality or condition of being such
2. (Philosophy) the quality or condition of being such
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in periodicals archive ?
As one approaches the stage of letting go to the suchness of being without striving against it, one is attaining to full authenticity
Birla, food and emotion: whether emotions can be worked on and altered in material ways--a short research note on South India, living Siva's linga: the changing emotional valences of a beloved image in the Tamil-speaking Saiva tradition, seeing suchness: emotional and material means of perceiving reality in Chinese Buddhist divination rituals, and when sad is good: affect among friends in and out of Japanese picturebooks.
For Zen, the world of 'suchness' is neither one nor many, neither uniform nor undifferentiated ...
He further recommends explaining Buddhism to Americans by retranslating the Buddhist term "Mind Essence," Dwight Goddard's influential translation of the Sanskrit term tathata (roughly "suchness," or the unelaborated nature of reality) (Goddard 1994, 518-19; Giles 2011, 194), as the "Mind of God" (Kerouac 1997, 198), prioritizing the use of theistic terminology recognizable to Westerners over philosophical accuracy.
Thus while phenomena are empty, the abiding reality (gnas lugs) is empty of phenomena but not of suchness. Lochen Dharmas'ri, along with the twentieth c.
This recognition is attained through recourse to the "Great Doubt of Zen," which brings one to an entry point into sunyata or a world of "suchness." The ordinary consciousness that depends upon representation is replaced by an unmediated knowledge that allows seeing reality "directly in its suchness" (113).
Thus Snyder's answer: "Nowhere, where he came from." "[T]hus that thing" means "thusness" or "suchness" (tathata), and in Mahayana Buddhism indicates the true nature of things as they exist before humans subjectify them.
It all had to do with a misunderstanding concerning duality, that it was singly real, when in actuality it was but one of many manners of apprehension each with its own claim of existential Suchness. The disintegrating parts of ourselves must knit up the raveled sleeve of itself and this comes from apprehension, comprehension and also through activity.
outside, nor in the middle, it is not contemplated in terms of suchness and thusness, gradual or progressive The motion of the mind is like a stream forever flowing [...] not thought in terms of arising and perishing that would only yield reversal and cessation Finally, the flowing thoughts would be self-extinct in stillness." (Hong Ren, n/p) Similarly, Zen master Lianchi (1535-1615) was enlightened while watching a crowd of monks taking a shower together, an episode that he described in "Ode to bathing", with the metaphor of the flow of water to illustrate the relationship between body and mind (Lian Chi, 1999:590).
not identity) with One, Absolute, God, Universe, Eternity--the end of the illusion of mistaken identity and separateness between individual and Universal, temporal and Eternal, and is thus synonymous with Self-Realization, the Realization of one's Union with One; Cosmic / Buddha / Christ / Krishna or God Consciousness; Mystical Union with God; Nirvana; Satori; Perfection; Suchness; WHAT IS; HERE & NOW ...
(43) Shinran explains:"Nirvana is called extinction of passions, the uncreated, peaceful happiness, eternal bliss, true reality, dharma-body, dharma-nature, suchness, oneness, and Buddha nature.
This is simply a prelude to an amiable over-all description of the four-fold Suchness of Reality and its self-qualified primal noumena, which is not attributable to simple, eidetically unqualified "bi-dimensional" entities (whose common qualification is solely based on "this" and "other", "yes" and "no", or at most "yes and/or no").