sucking-pig

sucking-pig

n
1. (Zoology) zoology a pig that is not yet weaned
2. (Cookery) another term for suckling pig
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014
References in classic literature ?
In the capacious belly of the ox were a dozen soft little sucking-pigs, which, sewn up there, served to give it tenderness and flavour.
Heaped up on the floor, to form a kind of throne, were turkeys, geese, game, poultry, brawn, great joints of meat, sucking-pigs, long wreaths of sausages, mince-pies, plum-puddings, barrels of oysters, red-hot chestnuts, cherry-cheeked apples, juicy oranges, luscious pears, immense twelfth-cakes, and seething bowls of punch, that made the chamber dim with their delicious steam.
On the other hand, Apicius' "Sucking-pig a la Vitellius" (the emperor Vitellius was called "the Glutton") is "roast in the oven" and alludes to "crackling." Whether it was Apicius's fewer recipes for roast pig than for boiled pig, or whether it was Swift's suggestion that the cannibalized infant remains "very good boiled, on the fourth day," or even whether it was Montaigne's remark on cannibals that "They have great abundance of fish and flesh that have no resemblance at all with ours, and eat them without any sauces or skill of Cookery, but plain boiled or broiled," but Lamb insisted that his pig "must be roasted.