suckling


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Related to suckling: unweaned, sickling, breastfed

suck·ling

 (sŭk′lĭng)
n.
A young mammal that has not been weaned.
adj.
Unweaned.

[Middle English suklinge : souken, suken, to suck; see suck + -ling, one that is young; see -ling1.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

suckling

(ˈsʌklɪŋ)
n
1. (Zoology) an infant or young animal that is still taking milk from the mother
2. a very young child
[C15: see suck, -ling1; related to Middle Dutch sūgeling, Middle High German sōgelinc]

Suckling

(ˈsʌklɪŋ)
n
(Biography) Sir John. 1609–42, English Cavalier poet and dramatist
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

suck•ling

(ˈsʌk lɪŋ)

n.
an infant or a young animal that is not yet weaned.
[1400–50]

Suck•ling

(ˈsʌk lɪŋ)

n.
Sir John, 1609–42, English poet.
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suckling - English poet and courtier (1609-1642)Suckling - English poet and courtier (1609-1642)
2.suckling - an infant considered in relation to its nurse
babe, baby, infant - a very young child (birth to 1 year) who has not yet begun to walk or talk; "the baby began to cry again"; "she held the baby in her arms"; "it sounds simple, but when you have your own baby it is all so different"
3.suckling - a young mammal that has not been weaned
young mammal - any immature mammal
4.suckling - feeding an infant by giving suck at the breast
alimentation, feeding - the act of supplying food and nourishment
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations

suckling

[ˈsʌklɪŋ] Nmamón/ona m/f
suckling piglechón m, lechoncillo m, cochinillo m
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

suckling

[ˈsʌklɪŋ] adj [pig, lamb] → de lait suckling pigsuckling pig ncochon m de lait
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

suckling

n (old)Säugling m; (= animal)Jungtier nt; out of the mouths of babes and sucklings (Bibl) → aus dem Mund von Kindern und Säuglingen; (fig)Kindermund tut Wahrheit kund (Prov)
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007
References in classic literature ?
Her nose was exactly regular, and her mouth, in which were two rows of ivory, exactly answered Sir John Suckling's description in those lines:--
Well, I have never set up for a man of the world, though sometimes when I have heard the Lovelaces of the day hinting mysteriously at their secret sins or boasting of their florid gallantries, I have remembered the last verse of Suckling's "Ballad of a Wedding," which, no doubt, the reader knows as well as I, and if not, it will increase his acquaintance with our brave old poetry to look it up.
Suckling's seat;"a comparison of Hartfield to Maple Grove.
At her table there were extra dishes at dinner, and the servants had vodka and roast goose or suckling pig.
She was suckling a new-born child, and another child, stark naked, was playing at her feet.
The lake, as I have hinted, was to a considerable depth exceedingly transparent; and as human infants while suckling will calmly and fixedly gaze away from the breast, as if leading two different lives at the time; and while yet drawing mortal nourishment, be still spiritually feasting upon some unearthly reminiscence; --even so did the young of these whales seem looking up towards us, but not at us, as if we were but a bit of Gulf-weed in their new-born sight.
The sperm whale, as with all other species of the Leviathan, but unlike most other fish, breeds indifferently at all seasons; after a gestation which may probably be set down at nine months, producing but one at a time; though in some few known instances giving birth to an Esau and Jacob: -- a contingency provided for in suckling by two teats, curiously situated, one on each side of the anus; but the breasts themselves extend upwards from that.
Sir John Suckling, a handsome and capricious representative of all the extravagances of the Court set, with whom he was enormously popular, tossed off with affected carelessness a mass of slovenly lyrics of which a few audaciously impudent ones are worthy to survive.
or do we entrust to the males the entire and exclusive care of the flocks, while we leave the females at home, under the idea that the bearing and suckling their puppies is labour enough for them?
Care will also be taken that the process of suckling shall not be protracted too long; and the mothers will have no getting up at night or other trouble, but will hand over all this sort of thing to the nurses and attendants.
He did not compare the new finger marks unintentionally left by Tom a few minutes before on Roxy's glass with the tracings of the marks left on the knife handle, there being no need for that (for his trained eye), but busied himself with another matter, muttering from time to time, "Idiot that I was!-- Nothing but a GIRL would do me--a man in girl's clothes never occurred to me." First, he hunted out the plate containing the fingerprints made by Tom when he was twelve years old, and laid it by itself; then he brought forth the marks made by Tom's baby fingers when he was a suckling of seven months, and placed these two plates with the one containing this subject's newly
Ex-soldier Andrew Bedford is inundated with letters from Cleveland Police, the courts and bailiffs addressed to convict Nathan Suckling.