suckling

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Related to sucklings: unweaned, sickling

suck·ling

 (sŭk′lĭng)
n.
A young mammal that has not been weaned.
adj.
Unweaned.

[Middle English suklinge : souken, suken, to suck; see suck + -ling, one that is young; see -ling1.]

suckling

(ˈsʌklɪŋ)
n
1. (Zoology) an infant or young animal that is still taking milk from the mother
2. a very young child
[C15: see suck, -ling1; related to Middle Dutch sūgeling, Middle High German sōgelinc]

Suckling

(ˈsʌklɪŋ)
n
(Biography) Sir John. 1609–42, English Cavalier poet and dramatist

suck•ling

(ˈsʌk lɪŋ)

n.
an infant or a young animal that is not yet weaned.
[1400–50]

Suck•ling

(ˈsʌk lɪŋ)

n.
Sir John, 1609–42, English poet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suckling - English poet and courtier (1609-1642)Suckling - English poet and courtier (1609-1642)
2.suckling - an infant considered in relation to its nurse
babe, baby, infant - a very young child (birth to 1 year) who has not yet begun to walk or talk; "the baby began to cry again"; "she held the baby in her arms"; "it sounds simple, but when you have your own baby it is all so different"
3.suckling - a young mammal that has not been weaned
young mammal - any immature mammal
4.suckling - feeding an infant by giving suck at the breast
alimentation, feeding - the act of supplying food and nourishment
Translations

suckling

[ˈsʌklɪŋ] Nmamón/ona m/f
suckling piglechón m, lechoncillo m, cochinillo m

suckling

[ˈsʌklɪŋ] adj [pig, lamb] → de lait suckling pigsuckling pig ncochon m de lait

suckling

n (old)Säugling m; (= animal)Jungtier nt; out of the mouths of babes and sucklings (Bibl) → aus dem Mund von Kindern und Säuglingen; (fig)Kindermund tut Wahrheit kund (Prov)
References in classic literature ?
But here the constable interposed with the constitutional principle 'words be blowed;' observing that words were but spoon-meat for babes and sucklings, and that oaths were the food for strong men.
At her table there were extra dishes at dinner, and the servants had vodka and roast goose or suckling pig.
She was suckling a new-born child, and another child, stark naked, was playing at her feet.
The lake, as I have hinted, was to a considerable depth exceedingly transparent; and as human infants while suckling will calmly and fixedly gaze away from the breast, as if leading two different lives at the time; and while yet drawing mortal nourishment, be still spiritually feasting upon some unearthly reminiscence; --even so did the young of these whales seem looking up towards us, but not at us, as if we were but a bit of Gulf-weed in their new-born sight.
George Wither (1588-1667), a much older man than Suckling and Lovelace, may be mentioned with them as the writer in his youth of light-hearted love-poems.
or do we entrust to the males the entire and exclusive care of the flocks, while we leave the females at home, under the idea that the bearing and suckling their puppies is labour enough for them?
First, he hunted out the plate containing the fingerprints made by Tom when he was twelve years old, and laid it by itself; then he brought forth the marks made by Tom's baby fingers when he was a suckling of seven months, and placed these two plates with the one containing this subject's newly