suckling

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Related to sucklings: unweaned, sickling

suck·ling

 (sŭk′lĭng)
n.
A young mammal that has not been weaned.
adj.
Unweaned.

[Middle English suklinge : souken, suken, to suck; see suck + -ling, one that is young; see -ling1.]

suckling

(ˈsʌklɪŋ)
n
1. (Zoology) an infant or young animal that is still taking milk from the mother
2. a very young child
[C15: see suck, -ling1; related to Middle Dutch sūgeling, Middle High German sōgelinc]

Suckling

(ˈsʌklɪŋ)
n
(Biography) Sir John. 1609–42, English Cavalier poet and dramatist

suck•ling

(ˈsʌk lɪŋ)

n.
an infant or a young animal that is not yet weaned.
[1400–50]

Suck•ling

(ˈsʌk lɪŋ)

n.
Sir John, 1609–42, English poet.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suckling - English poet and courtier (1609-1642)Suckling - English poet and courtier (1609-1642)
2.suckling - an infant considered in relation to its nurse
babe, baby, infant - a very young child (birth to 1 year) who has not yet begun to walk or talk; "the baby began to cry again"; "she held the baby in her arms"; "it sounds simple, but when you have your own baby it is all so different"
3.suckling - a young mammal that has not been weaned
young mammal - any immature mammal
4.suckling - feeding an infant by giving suck at the breast
alimentation, feeding - the act of supplying food and nourishment
Translations

suckling

[ˈsʌklɪŋ] Nmamón/ona m/f
suckling piglechón m, lechoncillo m, cochinillo m

suckling

[ˈsʌklɪŋ] adj [pig, lamb] → de lait suckling pigsuckling pig ncochon m de lait

suckling

n (old)Säugling m; (= animal)Jungtier nt; out of the mouths of babes and sucklings (Bibl) → aus dem Mund von Kindern und Säuglingen; (fig)Kindermund tut Wahrheit kund (Prov)
References in classic literature ?
But here the constable interposed with the constitutional principle 'words be blowed;' observing that words were but spoon-meat for babes and sucklings, and that oaths were the food for strong men.
Their mother when she had borne them and had done suckling them sent them to the Thrinacian island, which was a long way off, to live there and look after their father's flocks and herds.
He did not compare the new finger marks unintentionally left by Tom a few minutes before on Roxy's glass with the tracings of the marks left on the knife handle, there being no need for that (for his trained eye), but busied himself with another matter, muttering from time to time, "Idiot that I was!-- Nothing but a GIRL would do me--a man in girl's clothes never occurred to me." First, he hunted out the plate containing the fingerprints made by Tom when he was twelve years old, and laid it by itself; then he brought forth the marks made by Tom's baby fingers when he was a suckling of seven months, and placed these two plates with the one containing this subject's newly
In the van was a cart with a coffin in it, and on the coffin sat a comely young girl of about eighteen suckling a baby, which she squeezed to her breast in a passion of love every little while, and every little while wiped from its face the tears which her eyes rained down upon it; and always the foolish little thing smiled up at her, happy and content, knead- ing her breast with its dimpled fat hand, which she patted and fondled right over her breaking heart.
There were more seals than anything else, forming distinct groups, male and female, the father watching over his family, the mother suckling her little ones, some already strong enough to go a few steps.
Bethink thee, if thou dost relapse into thine infidelity, though thou are not so tender as a suckling pig I would I had one to break my fast upon thou art not too tough to be roasted!
Her nose was exactly regular, and her mouth, in which were two rows of ivory, exactly answered Sir John Suckling's description in those lines:--
Well, I have never set up for a man of the world, though sometimes when I have heard the Lovelaces of the day hinting mysteriously at their secret sins or boasting of their florid gallantries, I have remembered the last verse of Suckling's "Ballad of a Wedding," which, no doubt, the reader knows as well as I, and if not, it will increase his acquaintance with our brave old poetry to look it up.
Suckling's seat;"a comparison of Hartfield to Maple Grove.
At her table there were extra dishes at dinner, and the servants had vodka and roast goose or suckling pig.