suction

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suc·tion

 (sŭk′shən)
n.
1. The act or process of sucking.
2. A force that causes a fluid or solid to be drawn into an interior space or to adhere to a surface because of the difference between the external and internal pressures.
tr.v. suc·tioned, suc·tion·ing, suc·tions
1. To draw away or remove by the force of suction: suction fluid from the lungs.
2. To clean or evacuate (a body cavity, for example) by the force of suction.
adj.
1. Creating suction.
2. Operating or operated by suction.

[Late Latin sūctiō, sūctiōn-, from Latin sūctus, past participle of sūgere, to suck; see seuə- in Indo-European roots.]
American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fifth Edition. Copyright © 2016 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.

suction

(ˈsʌkʃən)
n
1. the act or process of sucking
2. (General Physics) the force or condition produced by a pressure difference, as the force holding a suction cap onto a surface
3. (General Physics) the act or process of producing such a force or condition
[C17: from Late Latin suctiō a sucking, from Latin sūgere to suck]
ˈsuctional adj
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

suc•tion

(ˈsʌk ʃən)

n.
1. the act, process, or condition of sucking.
2.
a. the force that, owing to a pressure differential, attracts a fluid or a solid to where the pressure is lowest.
b. the act or process of creating such a force.
v.t.
3. to draw out or remove by aspiration.
[1605–15; < Late Latin sūctiō sucking = Latin sūg(ere) to suck + -tiō -tion]
Random House Kernerman Webster's College Dictionary, © 2010 K Dictionaries Ltd. Copyright 2005, 1997, 1991 by Random House, Inc. All rights reserved.

suc·tion

(sŭk′shən)
An act or force that reduces the pressure in a space, causing a fluid or solid to flow into it from a region of greater pressure.
The American Heritage® Student Science Dictionary, Second Edition. Copyright © 2014 by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. Published by Houghton Mifflin Harcourt Publishing Company. All rights reserved.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suction - a force over an area produced by a pressure differencesuction - a force over an area produced by a pressure difference
force per unit area, pressure, pressure level - the force applied to a unit area of surface; measured in pascals (SI unit) or in dynes (cgs unit); "the compressed gas exerts an increased pressure"
2.suction - the act of suckingsuction - the act of sucking      
consumption, ingestion, intake, uptake - the process of taking food into the body through the mouth (as by eating)
Verb1.suction - remove or draw away by the force of suction; "the doctors had to suction the water from the patient's lungs"
suction - empty or clean (a body cavity) by the force of suction; "suction the uterus in an abortion"
2.suction - empty or clean (a body cavity) by the force of suction; "suction the uterus in an abortion"
surgical operation, surgical procedure, surgical process, surgery, operation - a medical procedure involving an incision with instruments; performed to repair damage or arrest disease in a living body; "they will schedule the operation as soon as an operating room is available"; "he died while undergoing surgery"
void, empty, evacuate - excrete or discharge from the body
suction - remove or draw away by the force of suction; "the doctors had to suction the water from the patient's lungs"
Based on WordNet 3.0, Farlex clipart collection. © 2003-2012 Princeton University, Farlex Inc.
Translations
شَفْط الهَواء، تَفْريغمَص، رِضاعَه
sáníodsávání
oppumpningopsugningsugning
szívásszivattyúzásszívóhatás
loftsogsog
siurbimas
piesūkšanāszīšana
nasávanieodsávaniesanie
emişemmehavasını alma

suction

[ˈsʌkʃən]
A. Nsucción f, aspiración f
by suctionpor succión or aspiración
B. CPD suction cup Nventosa f
suction disc Nventosa f
suction pump Nbomba f de aspiración, bomba f de succión
suction valve Nválvula f de aspiración
Collins Spanish Dictionary - Complete and Unabridged 8th Edition 2005 © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1971, 1988 © HarperCollins Publishers 1992, 1993, 1996, 1997, 2000, 2003, 2005

suction

[ˈsʌkʃən] nsuccion fsuction disc nventouse fsuction pad nventouse fsuction pump npompe f aspirante
Collins English/French Electronic Resource. © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

suction

nSaugwirkung f; (caused by air or water currents) → Sog m
Collins German Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged 7th Edition 2005. © William Collins Sons & Co. Ltd. 1980 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1997, 1999, 2004, 2005, 2007

suction

[ˈsʌkʃn] n (Tech) → aspirazione f
Collins Italian Dictionary 1st Edition © HarperCollins Publishers 1995

suction

(ˈsakʃən) noun
1. the action of sucking.
2. the process of creating a vacuum by reducing air pressure on the surface of a liquid so that it can be drawn up into a tube etc, or between two surfaces, eg a rubber disc and a wall, so that they stick together.
Kernerman English Multilingual Dictionary © 2006-2013 K Dictionaries Ltd.

suc·tion

n. succión, aspiración;
___ devicedispositivo de ___.
English-Spanish Medical Dictionary © Farlex 2012

suction

n succión f
English-Spanish/Spanish-English Medical Dictionary Copyright © 2006 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Engstrom: Choosing the right level of suction depends on what is being suctioned. Generally speaking, the negative pressure needed for the suctioning process is 80-100 mmHg.
Simple random sampling was used to assign patients to their respective groups: Group 1 comprised patients who were suctioned without NSI (n=32); while group 2 comprised patients who were suctioned with NSI (n=33).
Dark blood clots filled his rectum which were irrigated and suctioned. No active bleeding was noted at any of the four biopsy sites.