sudarium


Also found in: Wikipedia.

sudarium

(sjʊˈdɛərɪəm)
n, pl -daria (-ˈdɛərɪə)
(Historical Terms) another word for sudatorium, veronica2
[C17: from Latin, from sūdāre to sweat]
Collins English Dictionary – Complete and Unabridged, 12th Edition 2014 © HarperCollins Publishers 1991, 1994, 1998, 2000, 2003, 2006, 2007, 2009, 2011, 2014

sudarium

1. a cloth or handkerchief for wiping sweat from the face.
2. a sudatorium.
See also: Cleanliness
-Ologies & -Isms. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
16, 2014, the Sudarium, a gift from the Basilica de Volto Santo in Manoppello, was enthroned.
He had followed up Burman's mention of Shroud of Turin images: Christ's face, with its penetrating, impersonal gaze, owed something to painterly representations of the sudarium, St Veronica's kerchief, which was supposedly imprinted with Christ's face after she used it to wipe his face as he carried the Cross.
They were also called a sudarium, which translates from Latin to English as 'sweat cloth' and was used to wipe the sweat from the neck and face during hot weather.
Is the veil a reference to the sudarium and Veronica?
The original image, called Sudarium, is a cloth made of precious marine silk measuring 17 centimeters (6.70 inches) by 24 centimeters (9.45 inches).
Veronica with the Sudarium, the image of the veil with an imprint of Christ's face, accompanied by the inscription (not visible in the illustration) "HEC EST SALV[S] V[E]STRA" (This is your salvation).
"Witnesses to Mystery: Investigations Into Christ's Relics" by Grzegorz Gorny and Janusz Rosikon is a beautifully and profusely illustrated, 336 page compendium deftly organized into chapters on The Turin Shroud; The True Cross; The Holy Nails; The Sudarium of Oviedo; The Tunic of Argenteuil; The Holy Coat of Trier; The Veil of Manoppello; The Pillar of Scourging; The Crown of Thorns.
Additional evidence of the Shroud's authenticity comes from the recent research on the Sudarium of Oviedo, an ancient, bloodstained, linen cloth the size of a small towel that is claimed by tradition to have covered the head of Jesus after his crucifixion.
Veronica, who has pity on the suffering Christ and offers him what is either her veil or a sudarium (a napkin used to absorb sweat--sudor in Latin) with which to wipe his face.