suffect


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suffect

(ˈsʌfɛkt) Roman history
n
in ancient Rome, an additional or suffect consul
adj
(of a consulship or consul in ancient Rome) additional, added or elected during the course of a normal term of office
References in periodicals archive ?
(35) The second was Publius Canidius Crassus, who joined Antonius in 43 BC, held a suffect consulship in 40 BC and then campaigned with Antonius in the East.
[13] Suffect I.H., 1977, "A fame work of reference fate of pollutants in the air and water environment fate of pollutants in the air and water environment", (ed.
Enfin les heros du stoicisme d'opposition, tous deux affiles a la conspiration : Arria et son mari Caecina Paetus, consul suffect en 37, arrete en Dalmatie et transfere a Rome.
Kirk Freudenberg, musing on the possibility that the Fronto whose house is mentioned in the opening lines may have been appointed suffect consul in 96 CE by Domitian, makes the following observation (238):
Piso pater was an energetic supporter of Brutus and Cassius, and later it was he whom Augustus persuaded to be suffect consul in 23 B.C., precisely because he was easily recognizable as an erstwhile opponent of the Principate.(25) When Augustus fell seriously ill during that same year, he handed over the rationes imperii to Piso, with the result that, together with M.
Like the Valerii Catulli, the Sestii would have to wait for the principate before attaining nobility (though they arrived somewhat sooner: Sestius' son was suffect consul in 23).(79) As is the case in Poems 68 and 65, the medium by which Catullus hopes to engage a distinguished Roman is literature, though in Poem 44 the circumstances are altered.
16.40); according to the Acta Arvalium (CIL VI 2086.67), he was suffect consul in 156 C.E.
179); governor of Gallia Lugdunensis (central and northwestern France) (186) and then proconsul of Sicily (189); appointed suffect consul (to fill out another man's term) (190); became governor of Pannonia (eastern Hungary and northern Serbia) (191); hearing news of the murder of Pertinax by the Praetorians (March 23, 193), he gathered his troops, received their acclamation as Emperor, and set out for Rome as the avenger of Pertinax, having adopted his name; arrived in Rome to find the usurper Iulianus executed by the Senate in anticipation of his arrival; he disbanded and exiled the faithless Praetorian Guard, and organized a new Imperial bodyguard; he left Rome for the East to deal with C.
69.(46) His age and connection with Nerva should make him suffect consul around A.D.
Birth and early career unknown; following his praetorship, he campaigned against the Mauritanians and was the first Roman to cross the Atlas mountains (41); suffect consul (chosen to fill out the office of another) (42); as governor of Britain (58-61), he moved against the Druid stronghold on the Isle of Mona (Anglesey), but was caught unprepared by Boudicca's revolt (61); abandoned Londinium (London) and Verulamium (St.
(10) The dates of Fronto's birth and death are notoriously elusive: Van den Hout 1999: 63-64, 377-81, the only certain date, 142, being this suffect consulship.
138, five years before he became suffect consul, Marcus Cornelius Fronto was appointed tutor in rhetoric to the imperial princes Marcus Aurelius and Lucius Verus.