suffix

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suffix

Suffixes are morphemes (specific groups of letters with particular semantic meaning) that are added onto the end of root words to change their meaning. Suffixes are one of the two predominant kinds of affixes—the other kind is prefixes, which come at the beginning of a root word.
There is a huge range of suffixes in English, which can be broadly categorized as either inflectional or derivational.
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suf·fix

 (sŭf′ĭks)
n.
An affix added to the end of a word or stem, serving to form a new word or functioning as an inflectional ending, such as -ness in gentleness, -ing in walking, or -s in sits.
tr.v. suf·fixed, suf·fix·ing, suf·fix·es
To add as a suffix.

[New Latin suffīxum, from Latin, neuter of suffīxus, past participle of suffīgere, to fasten underneath, affix : sub-, sub- + fīgere, to fix, fasten; see dhīgw- in Indo-European roots.]

suf′fix·al adj.
suf′fix·al·ly adv.
suf′fix·a′tion (sŭf′ĭk-sā′shən), suf·fix′ion (sə-fĭk′shən) n.

suffix

n
1. (Grammar) grammar an affix that follows the stem to which it is attached, as for example -s and -ness in dogs and softness. Compare prefix1
2. anything that is added at the end of something else
vb
3. (Grammar) (tr) grammar to add (a morpheme) as a suffix to the end of a word
4. (tr) to add (something) at the end of a sentence, comment, or piece of writing
[C18: from New Latin suffixum, from Latin suffixus fastened below, from suffīgere, from sub- + fīgere to fasten]
suffixal adj
suffixion n

suf•fix

(n. ˈsʌf ɪks; v. ˈsʌf ɪks, səˈfɪks)

n.
1. an affix that follows the element to which it is added, as -ly in kindly.
2. something added to the end of something else.
v.t.
3. to add as a suffix.
4. to affix at the end of something.
[1595–1605; < New Latin suffīxum, n. use of neuter of Latin suffīxus, past participle of suffīgere to attach on top of =suf- suf- + fīgere to attach (see fix)]
suf•fix•al (ˈsʌf ɪk səl, səˈfɪk-) adj.
suf`fix•a′tion (səˈfɪk ʃən) n.

suffix


Past participle: suffixed
Gerund: suffixing

Imperative
suffix
suffix
Present
I suffix
you suffix
he/she/it suffixes
we suffix
you suffix
they suffix
Preterite
I suffixed
you suffixed
he/she/it suffixed
we suffixed
you suffixed
they suffixed
Present Continuous
I am suffixing
you are suffixing
he/she/it is suffixing
we are suffixing
you are suffixing
they are suffixing
Present Perfect
I have suffixed
you have suffixed
he/she/it has suffixed
we have suffixed
you have suffixed
they have suffixed
Past Continuous
I was suffixing
you were suffixing
he/she/it was suffixing
we were suffixing
you were suffixing
they were suffixing
Past Perfect
I had suffixed
you had suffixed
he/she/it had suffixed
we had suffixed
you had suffixed
they had suffixed
Future
I will suffix
you will suffix
he/she/it will suffix
we will suffix
you will suffix
they will suffix
Future Perfect
I will have suffixed
you will have suffixed
he/she/it will have suffixed
we will have suffixed
you will have suffixed
they will have suffixed
Future Continuous
I will be suffixing
you will be suffixing
he/she/it will be suffixing
we will be suffixing
you will be suffixing
they will be suffixing
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been suffixing
you have been suffixing
he/she/it has been suffixing
we have been suffixing
you have been suffixing
they have been suffixing
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been suffixing
you will have been suffixing
he/she/it will have been suffixing
we will have been suffixing
you will have been suffixing
they will have been suffixing
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been suffixing
you had been suffixing
he/she/it had been suffixing
we had been suffixing
you had been suffixing
they had been suffixing
Conditional
I would suffix
you would suffix
he/she/it would suffix
we would suffix
you would suffix
they would suffix
Past Conditional
I would have suffixed
you would have suffixed
he/she/it would have suffixed
we would have suffixed
you would have suffixed
they would have suffixed

suffix

A word or word part that is added to the end of another word, such as “-ness” in “dampness.”
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.suffix - an affix that is added at the end of the word
affix - a linguistic element added to a word to produce an inflected or derived form
ending, termination - the end of a word (a suffix or inflectional ending or final morpheme); "I don't like words that have -ism as an ending"
Verb1.suffix - attach a suffix to; "suffix words"
affix - attach or become attached to a stem word; "grammatical morphemes affix to the stem"
prefix - attach a prefix to; "prefixed words"
Translations
لاحِقَه في نِهايَة الكَلِمَه
přípona
endelse
sufikso
päätesuffiksi
dometaksufiks
képzõragtoldalék
skeyta viðviðskeytiviîskeyti
priesaga
piedēklis
suffiksendingsuffigere
sufix
prípona
pripona
son ek

suffix

[ˈsʌfɪks]
A. Nsufijo m
B. VTañadir como sufijo (to a)

suffix

[ˈsʌfɪks] nsuffixe m

suffix

n (Ling) → Suffix nt, → Nachsilbe f; (in code etc) → Zusatz m
vtanfügen, anhängen (→ to an +acc)

suffix

[ˈsʌfɪks] nsuffisso

suffix

(ˈsafiks) noun
a small part added to the end of a word that changes the meaning. goodness; quickly; advisable; misty; yellowish.

suffix

n. gr. sufijo.
References in periodicals archive ?
The paper has particularly taken up participant observation method to address the research question about image-schema of the locative suffix -/e/ both as an independent locative marker as well as when suffixed to two nominal postpositions of space.
This study determines the pattern of English (primary) word stress in Bi-syllabic and Tri-syllabic suffixed words and their roots by Pashto speakers in Khyber Pakhtunkhwa Pakistan and the effect of such affixation on stress placements.
In Lithuanian, Latvian, Russian, and English dictionaries, competition between the two suffixed adjectival derivatives can be observed, cf.
In a study by Schmitt and Zimmerman focusing on advanced learners' production of suffixed words, for example, many incorrect forms produced by the L2 learners appeared.
As a first step, -[??] suffixed frequentative verb forms were derived from adjectives: [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [long]' > [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [to lengthen, to stretch]', [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [heavy]' > [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [to grow heavy]', [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [big]' > [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [to grow larger, to swell]', [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [thick, dense]' > [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [to thicken]', [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [thick, bulky]' > [TEXT NOT REPRODUCIBLE IN ASCII] [to thicken]'.
Given this aim, the data retrieved from the lexical database of Old English Nerthus (www.nerthusproject.com) comprise 6,073 affixed (prefixed and suffixed) derivatives, including 3,008 nouns, 1,961 adjectives, 974 adverbs and 130 verbs.
For Khorasan Ulrich Seeger (2002: 635) does not give complete paradigms, but he shows the -n suffixed to the AP stem for MSG, and to the FSG suffix for the feminine singular.
wioercwida m 'contradicter' (subjective) wioercwide m 'contradiction' (objective) In order to pursue the question of functional derivations that add semantically interpretable functions such as the subjective or the objective, 480 suffixed nouns have been analysed, out of which 391 are subjective and 89 objective.
More specifically, if a predicate is the result of adding ge- to an underived base, and in a second step the structure is suffixed with the corresponding loss of the prefix, the final complex word will be represented as the combination of an underived base plus a suffix and the structure will be described as having one level of complexity.
(1998) suggest that reduplicants tend to appear on the opposite side of the root from the direction of affixation: a reduplicant tends to be prefixed if the relevant domain (stem, word) is predominantly suffixing; contrarily, a reduplicant tends to be suffixed if the relevant domain is predominantly prefixing.
This case marker is suffixed to the nouns, paangbhe 'village', paang 'house' and taangbhung 'forest'.
This study investigates the development of two levels of morphological knowledge that contribute to Spanish-English bilingual students' ability to recognize cognates: the ability to recognize a cognate stem within a suffixed English word, and knowledge of systematic relationships between Spanish and English suffixes (e.g., the fact that English words ending in "-ty" often have a Spanish cognate ending in "-dad".