sulkiness


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Related to sulkiness: sulkily, sulkier

sulk·y

 (sŭl′kē)
adj. sulk·i·er, sulk·i·est
1. Sullenly aloof or withdrawn.
2. Gloomy; dismal: sulky weather.
n. pl. sulk·ies
A light, open two-wheeled vehicle accommodating only the driver and drawn by one horse, used especially in harness racing.

[Perhaps alteration of obsolete sulke, sluggish, perhaps ultimately from Old English āsolcen, from past participle of āseolcan, to become sluggish. N., from its having only one seat .]

sulk′i·ly adv.
sulk′i·ness n.
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Noun1.sulkiness - a mood or display of sullen aloofness or withdrawalsulkiness - a mood or display of sullen aloofness or withdrawal; "stayed home in a sulk"
humour, mood, temper, humor - a characteristic (habitual or relatively temporary) state of feeling; "whether he praised or cursed me depended on his temper at the time"; "he was in a bad humor"
2.sulkiness - a feeling of sulky resentment
bitterness, rancor, rancour, resentment, gall - a feeling of deep and bitter anger and ill-will
3.sulkiness - a sullen moody resentful disposition
ill nature - a disagreeable, irritable, or malevolent disposition
Translations
عُبوس، تَجَهُّم
zamračenost
surmulenhed
durcásság
fÿla, önuglyndi
zamračenosť
asık suratlılıksomurtkanlık

sulkiness

[ˈsʌlkɪnɪs] Nmal humor m, enfurruñamiento m

sulkiness

nSchmollen nt; the sulkiness of his expressionsein eingeschnappter or schmollender Gesichtsausdruck

sulkiness

[ˈsʌlkɪnɪs] nmusoneria

sulk

(salk) verb
to show anger or resentment by being silent. He's sulking because his mother won't let him have an ice-cream.
ˈsulky adjective
sulking, or tending to sulk. in a sulky mood; a sulky girl.
ˈsulkily adverb
ˈsulkiness noun
References in classic literature ?
He was in that state of highly respectful sulkiness which is peculiar to English servants.
She was born the merriest of maids, but, being a student of her face, learned anon that sulkiness best becomes it, and so she has struggled and prevailed.
'Well, I'm sorry for it,' replied he, with more of sulkiness than contrition: 'what more would you have?'
Furthermore, he is rendered obstinate by a sulkiness occasionally incident to his temper, and brought on at present by the inadequate sensation which he conceives to have been produced in the bosom of Mrs.
I wish there may not be a little sulkiness of temper--her poor mother had a good deal; but we must make allowances for such a child--and I do not know that her being sorry to leave her home is really against her, for, with all its faults, it was her home, and she cannot as yet understand how much she has changed for the better; but then there is moderation in all things."
It exasperated him because it showed that she was not listening to anything he said, and yet, if he was silent, she reproached him for sulkiness. Her mind was of an order that could not deal for five minutes with the abstract, and when Philip gave way to his taste for generalising she very quickly showed that she was bored.
Baggs impenetrably wrapped up in dignified sulkiness. After informing me with a lofty look that she intended to go to Scotland with us, and to take my five-pound note--partly under protest, and partly out of excessive affection for Alicia--she retired to pack up.
(Yes, sulkiness, that's the right word for it!) I sat in my room like a spider.
I saw she was sorry for his persevering sulkiness and indolence: her conscience reproved her for frightening him off improving himself: she had done it effectually.
Stevie left alone beside the private lamp-post of the Charity, his hands thrust deep into his pockets, glared with vacant sulkiness. At the bottom of his pockets his incapable weak hands were clinched hard into a pair of angry fists.
He took refuge in a silly, muttering sulkiness. It was nothing to me, he mumbled.
He looked offended --as far as his old wooden face could express anything; and for days afterwards could be seen, almost any time of the day, sitting at the gate, with his nose over his knees, a pipe between his gums, and gathered up into a kind of raging concentrated sulkiness. Once he spoke to his son, alluding to the newcomers with a groan: "They will quarrel over the land." "Don't bother about that, father," answered Jean-Pierre, stolidly, and passed, bent double, towing a recalcitrant cow over his shoulder.