sumptuary law


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sumptuary law

n
(Law) (formerly) a law imposing restraint on luxury, esp by limiting personal expenditure or by regulating personal conduct in religious and moral spheres
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To which purpose serveth the opening, and well-balancing of trade; the cherishing of manufactures; the banishing of idleness; the repressing of waste, and excess, by sumptuary laws; the improvement and husbanding of the soil; the regulating of prices of things vendible; the moderating of taxes and tributes; and the like.
The guests were now seated at the table laden with the first course, which they ate as provincials eat, without shame at possessing a good appetite, and not as in Paris, where it seems as if jaws gnashed under sumptuary laws, which made it their business to contradict the laws of anatomy.
These clothes and trinkets they were wearing were as fine and dainty as the shrewdest stretch of the sumptuary laws allowed to people of their degree; and in these pretty clothes, she crying on his shoulder, and he trying to comfort her with hopeful words set to the music of despair, they went from the judgment seat out into the world homeless, bedless, breadless; why, the very beggars by the road- sides were not so poor as they.
Shaw is more positive about Luhmann's thinking around the individual and social structure, and pushes Luhmann's transition to the modern period back to the fifteenth century through considering 'self-expression' in sumptuary law, Thomas Hoccleve, and the almost unyieldingly 'impersonal' prose of William Worcester, all of which demonstrate 'the pressure coming from individual people to place themselves into the social world in ways that seem unpredictable sometimes, but always personal' (p.
The fact that some sumptuary law clauses had to be repeated several times indicates that these laws did not work in practice.
Gujarat has a sumptuary law in force that proscribes the manufacture, storage, sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages.
Gujarat has a sumptuary law in force since its formation in 1960 that proscribes the manufacture, storage, sale and consumption of alcoholic beverages.
By the seventeenth century, the body of the child no longer represented a sexual and societal blank slate, but instead recreated the social order of the civic elites through aristocratic clothing that drew on sumptuary law to safely express social distinction, social aspiration, and legitimized local authority.
To begin with, it seems to fly in the face of what undeniably was Elizabeth's seriousness about sumptuary law. Mocking any of England's laws was ground for fines and imprisonment, (4) but Miles's comment is particularly risky because it occurs within two years of Elizabeth's lengthy proclamation on the subject in 1588.
In the same way that sumptuary law imparts meaning to the forms of dress (the purple thread woven into a Roman toga, the length of sword permitted to an Elizabethan gallant), it can arrange a society's seating plan (proletarians allowed to occupy no more than 5,000 seats in Yankee Stadium for a World Series game), establish the hierarchy of polite behaviors and preferred taste (the caviar or the candied apple, the California zinfandel, or the rotgut Kentucky bourbon), determine which magazines may be sold in supermarkets (Glamour, not Maxim), and pluck from the playing fields of the NFL any referee too fat or too clumsy to be seen on television.
Rejecting efforts to establish liberalism through its separation from feudalism, Alan Hunt provides a nuanced account of sumptuary law. Pat O'Malley examines changes in the management of risk from welfare liberalism to late or advanced liberalism.
A sumptuary law was passed by the Massachusetts General Court prohibiting the purchase of woolen, linen, or silk clothes with silver, gold, silk, or thread lace on them.