sunder

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sun·der

 (sŭn′dər)
v. sun·dered, sun·der·ing, sun·ders
v.tr.
1. To break into two or more pieces or parts; sever: "Several disputed sculptures ... are sundered, with fragments residing in separate museums" (Lee Rosenbaum).
2. To force or keep apart: "Even our own kindred in the North are sundered from us" (J.R.R. Tolkien). See Synonyms at separate.
3. To form a barrier or border between: a river that sunders the two mountain ranges.
4. To dissolve (a connection or relationship): a disagreement that sundered their friendship.
v.intr.
To become broken into parts or disunited.

[Middle English sundren, from Old English sundrian.]

sun′der·ance n.

sunder

(ˈsʌndə)
vb
to break or cause to break apart or in pieces
n
in sunder into pieces; apart
[Old English sundrian; related to Old Norse sundr asunder, Gothic sundrō apart, Old High German suntar, Latin sine without]
ˈsunderable adj
ˈsunderance, ˈsunderment n
ˈsunderer n

sun•der

(ˈsʌn dər)

v.t.
1. to separate; part; divide; sever.
v.i.
2. to become separated; part.
[before 900; Middle English sundren, Old English (ge)sundrian (c. Old High German sunt(a)arōn, Old Norse sundra), derivative of sundor; see sundry]

sunder


Past participle: sundered
Gerund: sundering

Imperative
sunder
sunder
Present
I sunder
you sunder
he/she/it sunders
we sunder
you sunder
they sunder
Preterite
I sundered
you sundered
he/she/it sundered
we sundered
you sundered
they sundered
Present Continuous
I am sundering
you are sundering
he/she/it is sundering
we are sundering
you are sundering
they are sundering
Present Perfect
I have sundered
you have sundered
he/she/it has sundered
we have sundered
you have sundered
they have sundered
Past Continuous
I was sundering
you were sundering
he/she/it was sundering
we were sundering
you were sundering
they were sundering
Past Perfect
I had sundered
you had sundered
he/she/it had sundered
we had sundered
you had sundered
they had sundered
Future
I will sunder
you will sunder
he/she/it will sunder
we will sunder
you will sunder
they will sunder
Future Perfect
I will have sundered
you will have sundered
he/she/it will have sundered
we will have sundered
you will have sundered
they will have sundered
Future Continuous
I will be sundering
you will be sundering
he/she/it will be sundering
we will be sundering
you will be sundering
they will be sundering
Present Perfect Continuous
I have been sundering
you have been sundering
he/she/it has been sundering
we have been sundering
you have been sundering
they have been sundering
Future Perfect Continuous
I will have been sundering
you will have been sundering
he/she/it will have been sundering
we will have been sundering
you will have been sundering
they will have been sundering
Past Perfect Continuous
I had been sundering
you had been sundering
he/she/it had been sundering
we had been sundering
you had been sundering
they had been sundering
Conditional
I would sunder
you would sunder
he/she/it would sunder
we would sunder
you would sunder
they would sunder
Past Conditional
I would have sundered
you would have sundered
he/she/it would have sundered
we would have sundered
you would have sundered
they would have sundered
ThesaurusAntonymsRelated WordsSynonymsLegend:
Verb1.sunder - break apart or in two, using violence
fragment, fragmentise, fragmentize, break up - break or cause to break into pieces; "The plate fragmented"

sunder

verb
To crack or split into two or more fragments by means of or as a result of force, a blow, or strain:
Translations

sunder

[ˈsʌndəʳ] VT (liter) → romper, dividir, hender

sunder

(liter)
vtbrechen; chainssprengen; (fig) connectionabbrechen
vibrechen; (fig)sich trennen
References in periodicals archive ?
Along similar lines, Sunderer and Rossel (2012) find that while both economic and moral factors are important determinants of willingness to buy fair trade, moral factors are most important.
He described this as Robbins' "positivism." It was for this "crime" that Souter apparently identified Robbins as a "juggler with a static verbal logic," and a "profane sunderer of 'form' from 'substance'" (p.384ff).
When the dying Lawrence no longer had the energy or appetite for novel-writing, his poems continued to describe angels--sometimes in the familiar terms of "angels of the Kiss" and "the Sunderers" (Poems 707, 709) but also in terms of their defeat and withdrawal, "for man has killed the silence of the earth/and ravished all the peaceful oblivious places/where the angels used to alight" (Poems 725).