sunn hemp


Also found in: Wikipedia.

sunn hemp

 (sŭn)
n.
1. A tropical Asian plant (Crotalaria juncea) in the pea family, having clusters of yellow flowers.
2. A tough fiber obtained from the stems of this plant, used for cordage. In both senses also called sunn.

[Hindi san, from Sanskrit śāṇa-, hempen, from śaṇaḥ, hemp.]
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), belonging to the Fabaceae family, is an annual shrub with erect and determinate growth.
The experiment consisted of four treatments: T1- conventional yam planting (sole crop) fertilized only with cattle manure; T2- yam intercropped with sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea L.), IAC-KR1 variety; T3- yam intercropped with pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.), fava larga variety; and T4- yam intercropped with a combination of sunn hemp and pigeon pea.
Sunn hemp is a leguminous species widely used as cover crop because it has high phytomass production and increased accumulation of nitrogen (Torres et al., 2008), also showing a taproot system and, therefore, able to absorb nutrients from deeper layers, favoring the decompaction of the soil.
Whitetail Institute's high-protein (up to 38%) spring/summer annual PowerPlant[TM] (25 lbs., $59.95/50 lbs., $119) is now better than ever due to the replacement of sorghum with Sunn Hemp, a warm-season legume that grows tall very quickly and has very palatable leaves that are about 30% protein.
Crotalaria juncea, known as sunn or sunn hemp, is a tropical Asian plant of the legume family (Fabaceae).
Work by Agricultural Research Service scientists in Florence, South Carolina, suggests that farmers in the Southeast could use the tropical legume sunn hemp (Crotalaria juncea) in their crop rotations by harvesting the fast-growing annual for biofuel.
SUNN HEMP is a member of the Leguminosae (Fabaceae) family and economically is the most important species of the genus Crotalaria, which consists of about 550 species.
Hairy vetch (Vicia villosa Roth) and crimson clover (Trifolium incarnatum L.) contribute from 72 to 149 kg N [ha.sup.-1] (Clark et al., 1995; Ebelhar et al., 1984; Holderbaum et al., 1990; McVay et al., 1989), and sunn hemp residues incorporated into the soil may provide 350 kg N [ha.sup.-1] (312.6 lb [ac.sup.-1]) (Wang et al., 2002).
Brazil has produced sunn hemp for paper since the 1960s.